Adjective "inept" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ɪˈnɛpt/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Having or showing no skill; clumsy.
  1. 'He is socially inept, he has no personal life, yet he tries to help damaged minds.'
  2. 'Now inept council staff and councillors are to waste public money on proposals which do not address the situation.'
  3. 'This is the second year we have been disenfranchised by this inept system and incompetence behind its planning.'
  4. 'He has clearly lost the plot and is proving to be both inept and devoid of morality himself.'
  5. 'He did not let the army tackle the situation, leaving it to the inept and communal police force.'
  6. 'Apparently she was enraged by the inept actions of the person ahead of her at the drive-in ATM.'
  7. 'He made her feel so silly, so inadequate, so inept at being his secretary.'
  8. 'He visits his old office, tries to help out, but feels like he left the work in inept hands.'
  9. 'Most people couldn't afford, or felt too socially inept, to go and watch plays.'
  10. 'Consecutive governments have insisted on a completely inept policy of open immigration.'

Definitions

1. without skill or aptitude for a particular task or assignment; maladroit: He is inept at mechanical tasks. She is inept at dealing with people.

2. generally awkward or clumsy; haplessly incompetent.

3. inappropriate; unsuitable; out of place.

4. absurd or foolish: an inept remark.

More examples(as adjective)

"governments can be inept in responses."

"people can be inept by things."

"people can be inept at games."

"governments can be inept at things."

"dobieses can be inept at tasks."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘not apt, unsuitable’): from Latin ineptus, from in- ‘not’ + aptus (see apt).