Adjective "witty" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈwɪti/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Showing or characterized by quick and inventive verbal humour.
  1. 'Marlowe was charming and witty'
  2. 'It may sound boring and not clever or witty of me but I really, genuinely think it matters.'
  3. 'What shines through are the wonderful and witty lyrics and dastardly clever arrangements.'
  4. 'He was a witty, engaging, clever man who devoted his life to a political philosophy.'
  5. 'They knew there was a lot more to this warm, witty, sparkly and sprightly show than just the title song.'
  6. 'Mahd might have a witty sense of humour but he always has words of wisdom to say to me.'
  7. 'Radcliffe is witty and entertaining, but talks in diffident stops and starts.'
  8. 'What's more, the narrative has pace and is injected with witty dialogue and humour.'
  9. 'The trio presented witty, rude, clever songs, mostly delivered at a ferocious pace.'
  10. 'For this to be a real success, the programme would have also to be witty and inventive in its use of language.'
  11. 'Mrs. Drollmere had been a lively woman with a shrewd and witty sense of humour.'

Definitions

1. possessing wit in speech or writing; amusingly clever in perception and expression: a witty writer.

2. characterized by wit: a witty remark.

3. British Dialect. intelligent; clever.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be witty through exhaustions."

"people can be witty on problems."

"people can be witty in writings."

"people can be witty in styles."

"people can be witty in privates."

More examples++

Origin

Old English wit(t)ig ‘having wisdom’ (see wit, -y).