Adjective "watchword" definition and examples

(Watchword may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈwɒtʃwəːd/

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Definitions and examples

noun

A word or phrase expressing a person's or group's core aim or belief.
  1. 'The ‘line of command’ is broken and personal survival becomes the watchword instead of commitment to the organizations objectives.'
  2. 'Innovation and doing your own thing are a day-to-day affair, where the watchwords are innovation and unconventional solutions.'
  3. 'Innovation is the watchword of product development.'
  4. 'The tradition is that, as each new president is installed, he or she establishes a watchword or mantra for the four year term of office.'
  5. 'Democracy is sometimes the watchword of those who think that all political problems could be solved if only we became (what we are not yet) a real democracy.'
  6. 'The goal is to provide maximum community benefit from the resources available, and that should be the watchword for the museum as it prepares to embark on a major redevelopment at a very significant cost.'
  7. 'Authoritarianism, barely concealed under the fig leaf of ‘democracy’, became its watchword.'
  8. 'Under the watchword of making Australian industry competitive, successive governments have backed corporations in undertaking massive downsizing.'
  9. 'But the overriding watchword is public service delivery.'
  10. 'Its watchwords are corruption, reaction and criminality.'

More definitions

1. a word or short phrase to be communicated, on challenge, to a sentinel or guard; password or countersign.

2. a word or phrase expressive of a principle or rule of action; slogan: Conservation has been our watchword.

3. a rallying cry of a party, club, team, etc.

More examples(as adjective)

"chairmen can be watchword."