Adjective "wallets" definition and examples

(Wallets may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈwɒlɪt/

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Definitions and examples

noun

A pocket-sized flat folding case for holding money and plastic cards.
  1. 'He only looked through her wallet after leaving the flat, having stolen it in the hope that it contained money.'
  2. 'So I checked the back pocket for a wallet, took it out and found a driving licence.'
  3. 'I've never understood why people carry their wallets in a back pocket instead of a front one.'
  4. 'Finally, how do youth attitudes toward religion play our when it comes to their wallets and pocketbooks?'
  5. 'The new cards only have to be held near a special reader in order to function and cardholders don't have to remove the card from their wallets.'
  6. 'He pulls out his Iqaluit Legion membership card from his wallet, and flips it over.'
  7. 'The wallet contained very little money but he would have been disappointed to think that he had lost it.'
  8. 'Charlie's father had drilled it in to him to keep his pockets empty and his wallet light.'
  9. 'I spent two hours sliding pieces of paper into plastic wallets and putting them in files.'
  10. 'The money duly came from the public's purses and wallets, as it has done ever since.'

More definitions

1. a flat, folding pocketbook, especially one large enough to hold paper money, credit cards, driver's license, etc., and sometimes having a compartment for coins.

2. Chiefly British. a bag for carrying food, clothing, toilet articles, etc., during a journey; knapsack or rucksack.

More examples(as adjective)

"presidents can be wallets."

"heads can be wallets."

"recentlies can be wallets."

"people can be wallets."

"lasereds can be wallets."

More examples++

Origin

(wallet)Late Middle English (denoting a bag for provisions): probably via Anglo-Norman French from a Germanic word related to well. The current sense (originally US) dates from the mid 19th century.