Adjective "vituperative" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/vɪˈtjuːp(ə)rətɪv//vʌɪˈtjuːp(ə)rətɪv/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Bitter and abusive.
  1. 'But it became more vituperative, more personal, didn't it, Mark?'
  2. 'Moreover, the Liberals had just recently established a website feature attacking Conservatives in vituperative terms and claiming sole responsibility for attempts to save the centre.'
  3. 'While I'm glad you stated your opinions without recourse to any name-calling or vituperative outbursts, I'm sorry to have to lay down the cards and tell you that you're flat out dead wrong.'
  4. 'The attacks on Australian judges in recent times have become more vituperative, more sustained and more intensely personal.'
  5. 'His vituperative attacks have not made him a terribly popular figure on many campuses these days.'
  6. 'Her poems could be cajoling and vituperative, making love and war simultaneously, her sensual lyrics cohabiting with performance pieces.'
  7. 'Yet working-class people and lifestyles are subject to vituperative attacks.'
  8. 'Finally, even I was struck into amazed silence by the vituperative and downright nasty anti-festive sentiments contained in the latest missive from the boys.'
  9. 'A working-class boy who got to Oxford and was called to the bar, the 68-year-old never acquired the knack of political subtlety or a public tone of voice which was less than vituperative.'
  10. 'The assembly meeting was the scene of vituperative attacks on any attempt to mitigate the consequences of the victory.'

Definitions

1. characterized by or of the nature of vituperation: vituperative remarks.

More examples(as adjective)

"tones can be vituperative."

"turns can be vituperative."

"rhetorics can be vituperative."

"radicals can be vituperative."

"orators can be vituperative."

More examples++