Adjective "viol" definition and examples

(Viol may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈvʌɪəl/

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Definitions and examples

noun

A musical instrument of the Renaissance and baroque periods, typically six-stringed, held vertically and played with a bow.
  1. 'Beginning with the haunting sound of four recorders so infectious it was soon joined by the renaissance guitar, viols and voice for the first song, a celebration of the joys of hunting.'
  2. 'Although there is a display case devoted to bow-making, there is only one other case exhibiting the progression from the early viol to the contemporary violin.'
  3. 'Pelham Humfrey and Purcell brought a new, incisive style of string music to the Chapel Royal anthem as violins replaced the old viols.'
  4. 'The dozen instrumentalists are busy with recorder, flute, viols, theorbo, harpsichord and organ.'
  5. 'We were also treated to sensitively and beautifully played instrumental items, in combinations such as lute and flute, two recorders, two viols, recorder and viol, and crumhorn and viol.'
  6. 'This collection covers eight sacred solo/duet cantatas for soprano and/or bass with a quartet of period strings - two each of violins and viols de gamba with continuo.'
  7. 'Early music is the stuff of sackbutts, forte pianos and viols.'
  8. 'The Silver Swan is a madrigal that many of us have sung, but it is unlikely that Gibbons would have minded hearing it played as an instrumental piece - he himself suggested that his madrigals could be played by viols instead.'
  9. 'Instantly, she thought of Christmases past where she would sit by the hearth and Joan would play the viol.'
  10. 'The close relationship between the consort song and the Elizabethan verse anthem makes it at least possible that both genres began with the same scoring: voices and viols.'

More definitions

1. a bowed musical instrument, differing from the violin in having deeper ribs, sloping shoulders, a greater number of strings, usually six, and frets: common in the 16th and 17th centuries in various sizes from the treble viol to the bass viol.

More examples(as adjective)

"families can be viol."

Origin

Late 15th century (originally denoting a violin-like instrument): from Old French viele, from Provençal viola; probably related to fiddle.