Adjective "vintner" definition and examples

(Vintner may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈvɪntnə/

Advertisement

Definitions and examples

noun

A wine merchant.
  1. 'It is proposing that its members implement a ‘clean-air’ policy, similar to the compromise put forward by the vintners.'
  2. 'Others, like vintners, mercers, and drapers, dealt in goods brought into the town from more distant parts.'
  3. 'The rapidly escalating problem of violence and unruly behaviour on the streets of the tourist town was highlighted when vintners and senior gardaí convened for a joint press conference on Monday afternoon.'
  4. 'As we walk away from the cameras and lights, I give him a bottle of what an Edinburgh vintner called the Orson Welles of wines.'
  5. 'In 1416 he was described as a taverner, and later in life as a vintner and a merchant, and was on several occasions fined for infringements of the assize of wine.'
  6. 'This is particularly true if early indications from vintners about the negative impact of the introduction of the smoking ban in pubs and restaurants endure into the medium term.'
  7. 'His father was a publican who used his bar as a launching pad for a political career, initially as head of the Boston vintners association.'
  8. 'In a business in which wineries live and die on the happy tongues of sommeliers, wine writers, vintners, and importers, the vineyard is turning some taste buds in its favor.'
  9. 'A vintner found selling corrupt wine was forced to drink it, then banned from the trade.'
  10. 'Major towns had specialized guilds for different trades and London had a great variety of both mercantile guilds, such as grocers, goldsmiths, and vintners, and manufacturers like tailors and saddlers.'

More definitions

1. a person who makes wine or sells wines.

More examples(as adjective)

"holdings can be vintner."

Origin

Late Middle English: via Anglo-Latin from Old French vinetier, from medieval Latin vinetarius, from Latin vinetum ‘vineyard’, from vinum ‘wine’.