Adjective "temporizing" definition and examples

(Temporizing may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈtɛmpərʌɪz/

Definitions and examples

verb

Avoid making a decision or committing oneself in order to gain time.
  1. 'He has been temporizing, casting about for a strategy.'
  2. 'The council had temporized on quite crucial decisions.'
  3. 'The prime minister temporized and allowed things to drift.'
  4. 'Left in charge, he temporized, agonized, and cursed the fates.'
  5. 'He needs to be seen as a leader making bold strokes where others are temporizing.'
  6. 'They were not negotiating in good faith but were, rather, temporising.'
  7. 'Moderate leaders continue to temporize and avoid coming to grips with extremists.'
  8. 'Liberals are classified as weak, insipid, temporizing, and unprincipled.'

More definitions

1. to be indecisive or evasive to gain time or delay acting.

2. to comply with the time or occasion; yield temporarily or ostensibly to prevailing opinion or circumstances.

3. to treat or parley so as to gain time (usually followed by with).

4. to come to terms (usually followed by with).

5. to effect a compromise (usually followed by between).

More examples(as adjective)

"courses can be temporizing."

Origin

(temporize)Late 16th century: from French temporiser ‘bide one's time’, from medieval Latin temporizare ‘to delay’, from Latin tempus, tempor- ‘time’.