Adjective "temporary" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈtɛmp(ə)rəri/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Lasting for only a limited period of time; not permanent.
  1. 'He hoped the company would assist them in finding temporary accommodation.'
  2. 'In the past, permanent and temporary staff always had the same pay and conditions.'
  3. 'The council has offered them temporary accommodation.'
  4. 'The boys will stay in this temporary shelter until a better solution can be found.'
  5. 'During the road closures police advise drivers to use the temporary car parks.'
  6. 'He was searching for emergency temporary accommodation in the city centre.'
  7. 'He suffered some temporary weakness in his right hand.'
  8. 'Beauty is temporary, yet we live in a world that is preoccupied with looks.'
  9. 'We currently use temporary doctors but we can't carry on with this in the longer term.'
  10. 'Many people still live in temporary homes.'
  11. 'The team welcomed a new player into their ranks, albeit for only a temporary period.'

noun

A person employed on a temporary basis, typically an office worker who finds employment through an agency.
  1. 'The health workers, who are hired as temporaries, also want permanent positions.'
  2. 'Government is too important to be left to temporaries with no experience.'
  3. 'They provide temporaries to firms needing replacement workers on a short-term basis.'
  4. 'The workers are recruited as temporaries during the annual pilgrimage season.'
  5. 'The maid and the cook have a week off and mom and dad never hired any temporaries.'

Definitions

1. lasting, existing, serving, or effective for a time only; not permanent: a temporary need; a temporary job. noun, plural temporaries.

2. an office worker hired, usually through an agency on a per diem basis, for a short period of time.

More examples(as adjective)

"impacts can be temporary on volumes."

"uses can be temporary for amounts."

"moves can be temporary at supplies."

"lifts can be temporary in natures."

"jumps can be temporary for lengths."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin temporarius, from tempus, tempor- ‘time’.