Adjective "tedious" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈtiːdɪəs/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Too long, slow, or dull; tiresome or monotonous.
  1. 'So it may be only a hundred miles or so each way but they are tough miles, hard on the driver and tedious for the passenger.'
  2. 'Lack of a break after a long year's tedious work will reduce the efficiency of teachers.'
  3. 'Even when done in the darkroom at home, colour film processing is a long, tedious process.'
  4. 'It's a long, tedious interview, and I'm not going to go through it point by point.'
  5. 'This movie is tedious and tiring for the audience simply because it is overwhelming.'
  6. 'It was laborious and tedious and horrible, but it got me interested in math.'
  7. 'These magazines are good for a laugh but they get really really tedious and brain-numbing.'
  8. 'The work was slow and tedious because it yielded such a huge amount of information.'
  9. 'It must also be done within the planning process even if it seems tedious and time consuming.'
  10. 'We might even find it a bit tedious to keep reading about it in the papers.'

Definitions

1. marked by monotony or tedium; long and tiresome: tedious tasks; a tedious journey.

2. wordy so as to cause weariness or boredom, as a speaker, a writer, or the work they produce; prolix.

More examples(as adjective)

"structures can be tedious to humans."

"situations can be tedious in itselfs."

"applauses can be tedious to teams."

"tasks can be tedious."

"people can be tedious."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French tedieus or late Latin taediosus, from Latin taedium (see tedium).