Adjective "tearaway" definition and examples

(Tearaway may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈtɛːrəweɪ/

Definitions and examples

noun

A person who behaves in a wild or reckless manner.
  1. 'At the heart of the matter is the fact that Australians are our tearaway younger brothers and we love them.'
  2. 'A bail hostel may begin as no more than temporary accommodation for young tearaways, but becomes, in the course of time, housing for dangerous criminals.'
  3. 'Magnanimously, we proffered the encouraging thought that the young tearaway would soon be back in the Australian XI.'
  4. 'He's a product of workaday south London and was a bit of a tearaway in his younger days.'
  5. 'Some families in the area have also complained about being the victims of intimidation from young tearaways.'
  6. 'He entered Hughes' gym where he trains some of the best young fighters, and biggest tearaways, in the country.'
  7. 'She said too few Anti Social Behaviour Orders had been slapped on young tearaways and vandals, despite the misery they caused residents.'
  8. 'The young Reyes nonetheless had plenty of the tearaway in him when he started training with Sevilla at the age of nine.'
  9. 'Though it has to be said that Ms Gee Turner lost them when she suggested that young tearaways should be taken dog-sledding in the Arctic and not actually abandoned there to be eaten by polar bears.'
  10. 'Last week, Scotland on Sunday revealed that ministers wanted to tag children as young as 10 in an effort to clamp down on tearaways.'

More definitions

1. designed to be easily separated or opened by tearing: a box with a tearaway seal. noun

2. British. a wild, reckless person.

More examples(as adjective)

"spendings can be tearaway."

"twins can be tearaway."

"teachers can be tearaway."

"styles can be tearaway."

"runs can be tearaway."

More examples++