Adjective "tarred" definition and examples

(Tarred may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/tɑː/

Advertisement

Definitions and examples

noun

A dark, thick flammable liquid distilled from wood or coal, consisting of a mixture of hydrocarbons, resins, alcohols, and other compounds. It is used in road-making and for coating and preserving timber.
  1. 'It wasn't too much later that I found myself working as a roofer in Aspen, Colorado, carrying buckets of hot tar up a ladder.'
  2. 'I continued walking across the hot black tar of the parking lot until I reached a dark blue Ferrari.'
  3. 'She said if the road went through the area, it would transform Bennettsbridge into a major depot for tar and bricks.'
  4. 'The space between each pair of deck planks in a wooden ship was filled with a packing material called ‘oakum’ and then sealed with a mixture of pitch and tar.'
  5. 'But environment watchdogs said that residents have not been put at risk by a complex operation to remove chemicals including tar, cyanide, ammonia and carcinogenic coal naptha.'
  6. 'To remove tar, freeze it to brittleness with ice cubes and then scrape it off with a plastic spatula.'
  7. 'However, it is understood the substance is a waste product created during the distillation of tar, coal, oil or gas and contained sulphuric acid.'
  8. 'Spain needed pine for tar, turpentine, and wood-essential naval stores for its shipbuilding industry in Cuba.'
  9. 'Tar pits form when crude oil seeps to the surface through fissures in the Earth's crust; the light fraction of the oil evaporates, leaving behind the heavy tar, or asphalt, in sticky pools.'
  10. 'Commercial bit cleaner can be used to remove pitch and tar; however, a scrap piece of wood will usually do the trick.'
  11. 'The ratio of tar to nicotine produced in the tobacco smoke of low tar cigarettes is in fact closely similar to that of conventional cigarettes.'
  12. 'I was curious, are there any alternatives to cigarettes that don't have nicotine, tar, and all that other nasty stuff?'
  13. 'NRT products provide a way of coping with nicotine withdrawal without taking in the harmful substances of tar and carbon monoxide.'
  14. 'Earlier nicotine, carbon monoxide and tar were considered most harmful.'
  15. 'The fact that mild cigarettes contain less nicotine and tar than normal ones can create a false impression and lead people to smoke more than they otherwise would do.'
  16. 'The tobacco used in these contraptions is not loaded with tar and nicotine as are cigarettes and it doesn't produce the noxious smog which so irritates non-smokers.'
  17. 'There are, according to him, cigarettes available in India with five to six milligrams of tar and those with 18 milligrams of tar, but the average worked out to 12 milligrams.'
  18. 'In addition to nicotine, cigarette smoke is primarily composed of gases (mainly carbon monoxide) and tar.'
  19. 'Tobacco is a sweet smelling product of the aromatic leaves of the Nicotina plant, but contains carcinogenic and highly addictive substances like nicotine, tar and benzene.'
  20. 'In line with the motive to instruct, there are diseased organs, a liver shrivelled from alcohol abuse, lungs disfigured by cigarette tar, the misshapen brain of an Alzheimer's sufferer.'

verb

Cover (something) with tar.
  1. 'These roads were tarred just six months ago and with the recent rains, deep potholes have emerged.'
  2. 'A back road in the area had never been tarred and he wondered if there were any other roads like that in county Mayo.'
  3. 'By then the road was tarred, but just a few years previously it was nothing more than a graveled roadway.'
  4. 'This road will eventually be tarred up to Oranjemund, the southernmost town on the coastline.'
  5. 'Proper tarred roads should be built in rural areas and bus facilities made available in every nook and corner of the State.'
  6. 'He said although the distance being tarred may not be very long, its significance to the local economy is immense.'
  7. 'The aggregate number of kilometres of road that have been tarred, bridges built or repaired can also be quantified.'
  8. 'The shortest days has been 16 hours and it seemed shorter than any seven hour days I used to put in at a bank or tarring roads.'
  9. 'The corporation is very active at the moment in tarring roads in many housing estates.'
  10. 'When the city council decided to invite small and medium enterprises as contractors tarring roads in the city, almost half of the contractors were women.'

noun

A sailor.
  1. 'Earlier though, someone shouts the word ‘Avast!’ at a bunch of mutinous tars and everyone just giggles.’'
  2. 'To the tars of Victoria's navy, especially those returning from the farthest flung corners of the empire, the Azores were the gateway to home.'

More definitions

1. any of various dark-colored viscid products obtained by the destructive distillation of certain organic substances, as coal or wood.

2. coal-tar pitch.

3. smoke solids or components: cigarette tar. verb (used with object), tarred, tarring.

4. to smear or cover with or as if with tar. adjective

5. of or characteristic of tar.

6. covered or smeared with tar; tarred. Idioms

7. beat / knock/ whale the tar out of, Informal. to beat mercilessly: The thief had knocked the tar o

More examples(as adjective)

"itselfs can be tarred with brushes."

"roads can be tarred."

"strings can be tarred."

"roofs can be tarred."

"papers can be tarred."

More examples++

Origin

(tar)Mid 17th century: perhaps an abbreviation of tarpaulin, also used as a nickname for a sailor at this time.

Phrase

beat (or whale) the tar out of
tar and feather
tar people with the same brush