Adjective "suffocated" definition and examples

(Suffocated may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈsʌfəkeɪt/

Definitions and examples

verb

Die or cause to die from lack of air or inability to breathe.
  1. with object 'she was suffocated by fumes from the boiler'
  2. 'The little girl had been molested and asphyxiated, suffocated to death.'
  3. 'About ten people a year in the UK die from suffocating after having an allergic reaction to something they ate.'
  4. 'Another major bee pest is the tracheal mite, which gets inside adult bees and clogs their breathing tubes, essentially suffocating the insects.'
  5. 'En route, approximately half of the captives suffocated or were killed by shots fired by soldiers into the airtight containers.'
  6. 'Two of those killed were children, aged two and five, who suffocated when teargas was fired at the picket line.'
  7. 'A post-mortem examination showed he was asphyxiated, or suffocated.'
  8. 'SIDS, also called crib death or cot death, occurs when babies suffocate accidentally or stop breathing in an event called sleep apnea.'
  9. 'While climbing out of the window, his neck got stuck and it appears he was unable to breathe and suffocated.'
  10. 'I have been choked and almost suffocated to death during that time, all the while, more concerned about the well being of others than for myself.'
  11. 'That day she suffocated her son and then tried to kill herself.'
  12. with object 'you're suffocating me—I can scarcely breathe'
  13. 'Scheele described the chlorine gas formed as having a greenish yellow color and a suffocating odor ‘most oppressive to the lungs.’'
  14. 'Caked in cracked dirt and seeping sweat, crawling on all fours, suffocating from the heat, and trying to avoid startled lizards and bats, I cannot help but feel that I am glad they widened the tunnels for us.'
  15. 'Have mercy on me for I am suffocated with this heat.'
  16. 'The simplest is that for resuscitating those who have been temporarily suffocated by choking up the throat.'
  17. 'This remarkable evocation of childhood is set in an Italian hamlet during the hottest summer on record - the suffocating heat a perfect backdrop to the claustrophobic tension of the story.'
  18. 'In the opinion of these writers, sleepers in stuffy rooms were slowly suffocating in a toxic fog of their own breath, sweat, and flatulence.'
  19. 'The muggy, early-September night had descended on the suburban neighborhood, suffocating and heavy.'
  20. 'To complete the whole, the windows were all closed and the air suffocating.'
  21. 'The heat had suddenly become unbearable; he thought he might suffocate at any moment.'
  22. 'Sometimes she would wake at night unable to breathe, terrified she was suffocating.'
  23. 'I felt suffocated by London'
  24. 'I felt I was being trapped, suffocated by their delighted chatter and effusion.'
  25. 'One gets the sense that he finds the Western episteme constraining, if not suffocating, in its insistence upon the ideological hold and closure of meaning.'
  26. 'The loneliness that had been pervading my life and slowly suffocating me was now lifting, and I could breathe freely again.'
  27. 'The courtyard was completely silent, as it had been earlier, but now the silence seemed oppressive, suffocating.'
  28. 'One gruesome scene is shot behind an oppressive red filter, visually suffocating the viewer.'
  29. 'Perhaps David and his like will only be happy when they are known as ‘Citizen 326789’ or some similar Orwellian label that suffocates what remains of individual freedom.'
  30. 'What one generation considers the very definition of success - a steady job and a roof over one's head - the next often finds constricting, if not suffocating.'
  31. 'She couldn't find anything out of order, but sometimes she felt oppressed, suffocated.'
  32. 'The film's entertainment value is suffocated and the lack of individual character development means that the viewer's empathy in these heart-rending scenes is nonexistent.'
  33. 'Trapped, suffocating, and every other clichéd word one can look up in the thesaurus to describe being stranded in this small terraced island in the Pacific.'

More definitions

1. to kill by preventing the access of air to the blood through the lungs or analogous organs, as gills; strangle.

2. to impede the respiration of.

3. to discomfort by a lack of fresh or cool air.

4. to overcome or extinguish; suppress. verb (used without object), suffocated, suffocating.

5. to become suffocated; stifle; smother.

6. to be uncomfortable due to a lack of fresh or cool air.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be suffocated."

"people/places/organizations can be suffocated."

"voices can be suffocated."

"trades can be suffocated."

Origin

(suffocate)Late 15th century (earlier ( late Middle English) as suffocation): from Latin suffocat- ‘stifled’, from the verb suffocare, from sub- ‘below’ + fauces ‘throat’.