Adjective "scholastic" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/skəˈlastɪk/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Of or concerning schools and education.
  1. 'These events were in contrast to the more scholastic atmosphere of the sports tournaments which were umpired by teachers from the village primary school.'
  2. 'These children exhibited significant problems of scholastic underachievement, without any evidence of mental subnormality, learning difficulty or any behavioural or emotional disorder.'
  3. 'He didn't have the scholastic achievement I did.'
  4. 'I heard about everyone's grades and scholastic achievements.'
  5. 'In one hour, respite from the hardships of scholastic vocation was so easily achieved.'
  6. 'I resist it only because I think leadership is a quality that can't be enumerated with scholastic precision.'
  7. 'It is also a little reassuring that scholastic achievement across the range of abilities is so welcomed and valued in the public reaction to the results round.'
  8. 'Their key goal is achievement, but this aim is not exclusively scholastic.'
  9. 'We next explore the issue of student failure and whether increasing students' academic control can improve their scholastic development.'
  10. 'The first issue may include measures of scholastic achievement, aptitude tests, and selection interviews.'
  11. 'scholastic sports events'
  12. 'The aim is to promote their dominance in such areas as football, recruiting and scholastic sports along with its in-depth coverage.'
Relating to medieval scholasticism.
  1. 'Renaissance humanism gradually replaced the medieval scholastic tradition from which it emerged.'
  2. 'Internal evidence also suggests that he was a Benedictine monk and priest who was both educated and conversant with scholastic philosophy.'
  3. 'As the centuries passed they added more and more layers to the symbolic structures that reinforced such attitudes, while their overt messages disregarded the subtle reservations of scholastic theologians.'

noun

An adherent of scholasticism; a schoolman.
  1. 'These and later theologians would also have introduced him to the ideas of the Christian scholastics.'
  2. 'Thus we can see at this point a fundamental ‘vacuity’ in the attempt by Aquinas and other scholastics to harness ‘Plato and Aristotle’ for the purposes of Trinitarian doctrine.'
(in the Roman Catholic Church) a member of a religious order, especially the Society of Jesus, who is between the novitiate and the priesthood.

    Definitions

    1. of or relating to schools, scholars, or education: scholastic attainments.

    2. of or relating to secondary education or schools: a scholastic meet.

    3. pedantic.

    4. of or relating to the medieval schoolmen. noun

    5. (sometimes initial capital letter) a schoolman, a disciple of the schoolmen, or an adherent of scholasticism.

    6. a pedantic person.

    7. Roman Catholic Church. a student in a scholasticate.

    More examples(as adjective)

    "corps can be scholastic."

    "stocks can be scholastic."

    "shares can be scholastic."

    "skills can be scholastic."

    "sees can be scholastic."

    More examples++

    Origin

    Late 16th century (in scholastic (sense 2 of the adjective)): via Latin from Greek skholastikos ‘studious’, from skholazein ‘be at leisure to study’, from skholē (see school).