Adjective "scale" definition and examples

(Scale may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/skeɪl/

Definitions and examples

noun

Each of the small, thin horny or bony plates protecting the skin of fish and reptiles, typically overlapping one another.
  1. 'Brackish spray flew over his face as fins and scales and gnashing teeth tore at the air.'
  2. 'No one is quite sure how these cells differentiate to form structures as diverse as the elastic outer layer of skin, the stiff scales of fish, or the softness of feathers.'
  3. 'Egg masses consist of 25 to 50 whitish eggs laid overlapping each other like fish scales.'
  4. 'Even very small, fragile bones and fish scales are preserved in the deposits.'
  5. 'My job was to crouch down under these machines with the sweating women working up there, the fish guts and scales raining down on me.'
  6. 'I eat everything I can of the fish, scales, bones, blood, organs, and eyes.'
  7. 'One wall is taken up with an elaborately tooled wine display, and another is covered in an intricately curving leather design, like reptile scales.'
  8. 'The roof-tiles are overlapped like the scales of a snake about to shed its skin.'
  9. 'Check the fish for any stray scales and loose bones.'
  10. 'The sheer amount of them created the illusion that the chamber walls were frilly like the skin of a reptile with disjointed scales.'
A thick, dry flake of skin.
  1. 'The fungal spores found in the pillows fed off human skins scales and dust mite faeces.'
  2. 'Brushing your baby's scalp with a soft brush, like a toothbrush, can help loosen scales or flakes.'
  3. 'Using a scalpel blade, the scales are scraped at the active border of the lesion, with particular care not to cause pain or bleeding.'
  4. 'Skin cells regularly die and flake off in scales - but in people with psoriasis this process happens within days rather than weeks.'
  5. 'For instance, you can smear a homemade mixture into the opened scales of a pinecone, then hang the cone from a tree branch.'
  6. 'The buds left at winter pruning begin to swell in the few weeks prior to budbreak, and budbreak itself is marked by the first signs of green in the vineyard, as the first young leaves unfold and push through the bud scales.'
A flaky covering or deposit.
  1. 'Primary lesions are erythematous papules and plaques with gray/white, silvery scale.'
  2. 'Sometimes it presents as a white scale over a pink macule or papule.'
  3. 'If scale is extensive in the scalp, the scale may be softened with oil, gently brushed free with a baby hairbrush and then washed clear.'
  4. 'The lesion is demarcated sharply and the scale often is thick.'
  5. 'Close examination reveals a reticulated pattern of white scale known as Wickham's striae.'
  6. 'If left untreated, the scale may become thick, yellow and greasy and, occasionally, secondary bacterial infection may occur.'
  7. 'This is the white scale or platy stuff that you may see on the inside of the dishwasher or coffee pots or other hot water contact areas.'
  8. 'If plaque is not thoroughly removed, salts from the saliva cause it to become hard and form scale or dental calculus.'
  9. 'Every so often it is advisable to remove the mineral scale that builds up on the electrical heater element and in the reservoir pan.'
  10. 'Pipes can become clogged with scale that reduces water flow and ultimately requires pipe replacement.'

verb

Remove scale or scales from.
  1. 'Ensure that fish fillets are scaled and skinned and that there is no blood or viscera left on flesh.'
  2. 'She shrugged it off and returned to scaling the fish.'
  3. 'Visit your dentist or hygienist to have your teeth scaled and polished on a regular basis.'
  4. 'In the 1950s we scaled and cleaned teeth mainly by hand ultrasonic scalers and efficient aspirators of particulate matter and spray had yet to appear.'
(especially of the skin) form scales.
  1. 'Other signs include hair loss, redness, scaling and secondary infection.'
  2. 'In very young babies there's a kind of eczema called cradle cap, where there's scaling on the scalp.'
  3. 'Severe dry skin, accompanied by scaling, flaking and itching that no amount of moisturizing seems to relieve, could be a sign of a more serious problem.'
  4. 'Psoriasis of the perineal skin presents as redness with itching and scaling.'
  5. 'First, the scalp is examined for evidence of erythema, scaling, or inflammation.'
  6. 'Skin cancers, such as basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, often affect the ear but will generally cause only localized surface change, scaling, and erosion.'
  7. 'It is characterized by fissuring, maceration, and scaling in the interdigital spaces of the fourth and fifth toes.'
  8. 'the paint was scaling from the brick walls'

More definitions

1. Zoology. one of the thin, flat, horny plates forming the covering of certain animals, as snakes, lizards, and pangolins. one of the hard, bony or dentinal plates, either flat or denticulate, forming the covering of certain other animals, as fishes.

2. any thin, platelike piece, lamina, or flake that peels off from a surface, as from the skin.

3. Botany. Also called bud scale. a rudimentary body, usually a specialized leaf and often covered with hair, wax, or resin, enclosing an immat

More examples(as adjective)

"programmes can be scale in/at/on days."

"programmes can be scale down to takes."

"people can be scale to roads."

"people can be scale into frames."

"people can be scale down to fits."

More examples++

Origin

(scale)Middle English: shortening of Old French escale, from the Germanic base of scale.

Phrase

the scales fall from someone's eyes