Adjective "relevant" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈrɛləv(ə)nt/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Closely connected or appropriate to what is being done or considered.
  1. 'the candidate's experience is relevant to the job'
  2. 'You must therefore plan carefully to make sure you are covering relevant material.'
  3. 'So I wanted the council to know what had happened to me because I thought it was relevant.'
  4. 'We must keep it going long-term and make it relevant to people here and over there.'
  5. 'It has been passed on to the relevant higher authorities who are treating it very seriously.'
  6. 'Did the Minister leave relevant matter out of account in deciding to make the Order?'
  7. 'To achieve this it has had to make sure that all relevant facts are carefully considered.'
  8. 'That is a relevant matter in considering whether or not the children had settled.'
  9. 'If not, please call me and explain and then maybe I can contact the relevant people.'
  10. 'The rules, however, are only relevant to the way the safety camera scheme is funded.'
  11. 'They in turn would identify the relevant vehicle and stop it at a safe place in order to speak to the driver.'
  12. 'her films are relevant for feminists today'
  13. 'This reliance on contemporary artists is an important part of Tate Britain's strategy for staying relevant.'
  14. 'The issues discussed are topical and relevant.'
  15. 'I just like to make records that I believe are conscious or socially relevant.'
  16. 'Like the novel itself, the film still feels as relevant and potent as ever.'
  17. 'We have to continue to ensure our conference stays relevant to today's teaching issues.'

Definitions

1. bearing upon or connected with the matter in hand; pertinent: a relevant remark.

More examples(as adjective)

"costs can be relevant to decisions."

"unions can be relevant to people."

"types can be relevant during things."

"studies can be relevant in/at/on todays."

"studies can be relevant to worlds."

More examples++

Origin

Early 16th century (as a Scots legal term meaning ‘legally pertinent’): from medieval Latin relevant- ‘raising up’, from Latin relevare.