Adjective "quince" definition and examples

(Quince may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/kwɪns/

Definitions and examples

noun

A hard, acid pear-shaped fruit used in preserves or as flavouring.
  1. 'This one was served in a small shot glass: a layer of quince compote and a layer of lemon jelly, topped with quince syrup.'
  2. 'The fruit is sweet enough to eat fresh, though the texture is a lot like other quinces.'
  3. 'We had a generous plate of properly chambréd farmhouse cheese, which included Gubeen, St Agur and a hard sheep's cheese served with quince jelly, grapes and figs.'
  4. 'Place the quince slices as well as the peels and cores into a large sauce pan.'
  5. 'An uncomplicated salad of arugula and manchego shimmers in its piquant quince dressing.'
  6. 'Thinly sliced Spanish chorizo was our favorite accompaniment, but the cheese's acidity also makes it a good match for quince paste or dried fruit.'
  7. 'Other fruits and vegetables coming through the laboratory with diseases included figs, pears, quinces, raspberries, nectarines, cherries, onions, lettuces, corn, mung beans and pumpkins.'
  8. 'You can serve them with apple or quince compôte, with cream cheese and raisins, or with yoghurt and honey instead - but just remember that it's Pancake Day, not Wild Experiments With Batter Day.'
  9. 'Seasonal fruits such as sour cherries, plums, quinces, and grapes are made into thick jam, which is traditionally served to visitors and eaten from a glass jar with a spoon.'
  10. 'The cheese trolley is filled with Portuguese goat and sheep cheeses, to be eaten with a traditional slice of quince paste.'
The shrub or small tree which bears quinces, native to western Asia.
  1. 'Flowering quince is Chaenomeles, that dense, thorny, spring-blooming shrub that comes in all those incomparably rich and tarty hot colors.'
  2. 'Formal beds, divided by paths, probably contained a mixture of fragrant herbs, flowers including honeysuckle and rose, and fruit trees such as mulberry and quince.'
  3. 'You are supposed to be able to throw your hat through the middle of a quince tree without obstruction!'
  4. 'The gold lasted for barely a year but in the meantime numerous trees were planted in the area: wild acacia, teak, olive, tambotie, beech, ebony, seringa, mimosa and quince.'
  5. 'Wall shrubs including pyracantha or ornamental quince can be trained and get less out of control than some vigorous climbers.'
  6. 'There were mangoes and cherries and quinces and apples and apricots and almonds, and beyond the orchards there were thickets of tamarisk and casuarina as well as groves of mulberry trees belonging to the silk farmers.'
  7. 'The quince is native to the Caucasus, where wild, bent little trees still grow on the hillsides, but it spread quickly throughout the ancient world, being taken up by the Persians, the Greeks and, of course, the Romans.'

More definitions

1. either of two small trees, Cydonia oblonga or C. sinensis, of the rose family, bearing hard, fragrant, yellowish fruit used chiefly for making jelly or preserves.

2. the fruit of such a tree.

More examples(as adjective)

"parties can be quince."

Origin

Middle English (originally a collective plural): from Old French cooin, from Latin (malum) cotoneum, variant of (malum) cydonium ‘apple of Cydonia (= Chania, in Crete)’.