Adjective "queer" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/kwɪə/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Strange; odd.
  1. 'On the way home he wonders why he must be so queer and strange and spoil things.'
  2. 'A queer assortment, though such combinations are not unusual in the rural areas.'
  3. 'With a queer uncanny innocence, he seems always to have taken this one thing for granted.'
  4. 'I invite you to relive this most extraordinary of expeditions with me as we explore the strange and queer lands of England, Scotland, and the airport in Germany.'
  5. 'It was a queer remark, mediaeval in its construction, but searing in its heat.'
  6. 'Something in Dana's head felt weird, but not any stranger than the queer feeling in her heart.'
  7. 'Dr. Strange is known for being the master of the queer and unusual dark arts of magic.'
  8. 'There is a curious, not to say queer paradox here, though.'
  9. 'The rest of the group will be wearing masks called Zevala, dedicated to eccentric and queer animals from mythology.'
  10. 'This is a strange, queer, odd bunch - an odd assortment.'
  11. 'he was feeling rather queer'
(of a person) homosexual.
  1. 'nightclubs have traditionally been a space where queer people, trans women in particular, can explore gender with relative safety'

noun

A homosexual man.

    verb

    Spoil or ruin (an agreement, event, or situation)
    1. 'Even so, the scene is in no need of being further queered by Brian Kulick, the director of the New York Shakespeare Festival's current Central Park revival.'
    2. 'This year's general election saw the media do several things which queered the pitch of the election debate.'
    3. 'He knew killing Vida would queer his deal with Zoltan and leave him worse off than before.'
    4. 'The two major parties use the tyranny of their majority to put their own people - their own stooges - on the commission, to make sure that they queer the pitch in their own favour.'
    5. 'Aware, in his mid-forties, that all the time off for cricket had queered his prospects for mainstream advancement at the bank, Alan seized the new career opportunity.'
    6. 'And it's the families that could wind up queering this deal.'
    7. 'Any unwelcome associations between this and the firm's frequent difficulties in getting its software delivered on time were obviously not enough to queer the deal.'
    8. 'As with any partnering strategy the question is how deep does the relationship run and how do the companies stop queering each other's pitch.'
    9. 'The ‘beer orders’ of 1989, which forced brewers to offload their vast tied estates, further queered the brewers' pitch.'
    10. 'The financial services industry has to a large extent queered its own pitch.'

    More examples(as adjective)

    "people can be queer at lunches."

    "people can be queer as notes."

    "people can be queer after funerals."

    "people can be queer."

    "streets can be queer."

    More examples++

    Origin

    Early 16th century: considered to be from German quer ‘oblique, perverse’, but the origin is doubtful.

    Phrase

    in Queer Street
    queer fish
    queer someone's pitch