Adjective "promise" definition and examples

(Promise may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈprɒmɪs/

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Definitions and examples

noun

A declaration or assurance that one will do something or that a particular thing will happen.
  1. with infinitive 'I did not keep my promise to go home early'
  2. 'The people nurse deep alienation with the political system and cynicism about the democratic process due to their sad experience of broken promises and forgotten assurances.'
  3. 'A solemn promise was also made at the end.'
  4. 'Like many others, he was lured away by promises of a richer life.'
  5. 'Educated and ambitious, they are lured here by the promise of material acquisition.'
  6. 'Who is going to be taken in by promises or assurances in election time?'
  7. 'However, they insist that the government's promises have been broken.'
  8. 'The promise of the reward was too much of an enticement for the migrant workers to resist.'
  9. 'We will not hand over our consciences in return for a hollow promise of safety.'
  10. 'Despite promises of support for people who say they cannot afford to pay tuition fees, the Government has still been accused of pricing higher education out of many people's reach.'
  11. 'All the promises, all the assurances, were broken.'
  12. 'Today sees the conclusion of the regatta with three races and the promise of improving weather.'
  13. 'For children like these, the promise of peace in Angola may come too late.'
  14. 'The promise of a fine indoor season had been curtailed during a training break in Florida.'
  15. 'The promise of prosperity and peace that heralded the end of the Cold War is a distant memory.'
  16. 'The dialogue of diplomacy then carries the threat of war rather than the promise of peace.'
The quality of potential excellence.
  1. 'The majority of childhood prodigies never fulfill their early promise.'
  2. 'Continuing research in this field holds great promise for the future.'
  3. 'Although they all start out with great promise and potential, they invariably end up a disappointment and we hear nothing more about them.'
  4. 'For him, this odd little satellite traveling around an evocative solar star represents promise and potential.'
  5. 'To them, he is indicative of a crucial historical phase in Brazil's development and he embodies their country's unfulfilled promise and wasted potential.'
  6. 'New approaches show promise, potentially bringing a proof of the Riemann hypothesis within reach.'
  7. 'Most consolidation plays failed to realize both their promise and potential.'
  8. 'He was a natural leader, and he began his reign with great promise and potential.'
  9. 'Polley is packed with promise and potential.'
  10. 'On the contrary, molecular medicine holds remarkable promise for improving quality of life and delivering health care more equitably.'

verb

Assure someone that one will definitely do something or that something will happen.
  1. with clause 'she made him promise that he wouldn't do it again'
  2. with two objects 'he promised her the job'
  3. 'I definitely don't promise to stop hoping that you'll bury the hatchet already.'
  4. 'After an assessment, these advisors promise to deliver strategic suggestions to move your career to the next level.'
  5. '"He won't hurt you, " Ally promised with a smile.'
  6. 'An inspector arrived later and promised to have the job done last Friday.'
  7. 'For the unemployed, he is promising to create 200,000 jobs a year.'
  8. 'The reduction in my expenses in a certain way was something that I definitely promised to do if I got this money.'
  9. 'Bosses have promised to find alternative jobs within the company for as many people as possible.'
  10. 'He had left his job and had promised in his resignation letter to repay all the money.'
  11. 'The government has already promised to have 25,000 officers in place by 2008.'
  12. 'Politicians promise what they want, not what they can do.'
Give good grounds for expecting (a particular occurrence)
  1. with infinitive 'it promised to be a night that all would remember'
  2. 'This play promises a surprise finale that will shock not only the audience, but the actors as well.'
  3. 'The tandoori food festival promises the most delectable of your favourite cuisine.'
  4. 'Each merger promised to deliver bigger and better results for both customers and shareholders.'
  5. 'Mr Holland said that he was looking forward to what promised to be the best festival yet.'
  6. 'Even more than the transfer of power at the top of the party, this change promises fundamental transformation of the political order itself.'
  7. 'The crackdown is not aimed at organised firework shows and tonight promises a feast of spectacular events.'
  8. 'forecasters were promising a record snowfall in Boston'
  9. 'Cuba is on the bounce-back this year, with Virgin Atlantic promising direct flights to Havana in the summer.'
  10. 'Forecasters were promising a record snowfall in Boston, Massachusetts, and up to a metre of snow on the Cape Cod peninsula, southeast of Boston.'
  11. 'He recently went on record to promise a frank report from the 12-year inquiry into collusion between security forces and loyalist paramilitaries.'
  12. 'Just before the drawing the lots, she took a lot of time going through the showroom, floor by floor, promising herself that she would be back on a shopping spree.'
  13. 'Have you been promising yourself that you will take up something new to get you out during the summer, but then somehow you always manage to end up in the pub?'
  14. 'You seem not quite ready yet, but promise yourself to expect something interesting in the future.'
  15. 'Eventually, the idea goes, it won't feel like you're following a program at all, but rather, instinctively performing the good habits you've always promised yourself you'd develop.'
  16. 'We had, though, always promised ourselves that we'd do something ‘special’ for the 25th.'
  17. 'Now is the time to lose all that weight you've been promising yourself.'
  18. 'I keep promising myself that I'll learn British Sign Language so that I can speak with my hands.'
  19. 'For a few months I kept promising myself I would ‘investigate’ the ghostly phenomenon and nail the suspect, but never got down to it for some reason or the other.'
  20. 'It looks like I'll be able to justify having the small roast-potato on Christmas Day that I've been promising myself for months.'
  21. 'Not having a cigarette when you've promised yourself one leaves your body feeling orphaned and betrayed.'

More definitions

1. a declaration that something will or will not be done, given, etc., by one: unkept political promises.

2. an express assurance on which expectation is to be based: promises that an enemy will not win.

3. something that has the effect of an express assurance; indication of what may be expected.

4. indication of future excellence or achievement: a writer who shows promise.

5. something that is promised. verb (used with object), promised, promising.

6. to engage or undert

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be promise in/at/on times."

"oracles can be promise in servers."

"manies can be promise in/at/on dawns."

"people can be promise."

"people/places/organizations can be promise."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin promissum ‘something promised’, neuter past participle of promittere ‘put forth, promise’, from pro- ‘forward’ + mittere ‘send’.

Phrase

I promise (or I promise you)
on a promise
promise (someone) the earth (or moon)
promises, promises