Adjective "promiscuous" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/prəˈmɪskjʊəs/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Having or characterized by many transient sexual relationships.
  1. 'they ran wild, indulging in promiscuous sex and experimenting with drugs'
  2. 'Rather, their narratives suggest that they believe female role models who exhibit sexual agency have a status that protects them from being labeled as promiscuous.'
  3. 'Still, you have reason to be hesitant if he's been promiscuous lately.'
  4. 'If the girl was deemed promiscuous, became pregnant, or could not keep a job, she could be returned to the reform school.'
  5. 'After many years of directing my own sexual education in Paris, I came to see myself as a ‘liberated woman,’ or what some perhaps would call a promiscuous adventurer.'
  6. 'Instead, he chose to focus his question on the client's change to not being promiscuous.'
  7. 'The only reason he turned her down is because this rumor got started that Christy was the most promiscuous girl at our school.'
Demonstrating or implying an unselective approach; indiscriminate or casual.
  1. 'There's a difference between being promiscuous and making serious strategic bets that may be the cause for regrets.'
  2. 'Americans are free to choose from a promiscuous array of values'

Definitions

1. characterized by or involving indiscriminate mingling or association, especially having sexual relations with a number of partners on a casual basis.

2. consisting of parts, elements, or individuals of different kinds brought together without order.

3. indiscriminate; without discrimination.

4. casual; irregular; haphazard.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be promiscuous at alls."

"people can be promiscuous."

"sexes can be promiscuous."

"behaviours can be promiscuous."

"societies can be promiscuous."

More examples++

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin promiscuus ‘indiscriminate’, (based on miscere ‘to mix’) + -ous. The early sense was ‘consisting of elements mixed together’, giving rise to ‘indiscriminate’ and ‘undiscriminating’, whence the notion of ‘casual’.