Adjective "polite" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/pəˈlʌɪt/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Having or showing behaviour that is respectful and considerate of other people.
  1. 'In the UK, and most of Europe, it is not considered polite to just say what you want.'
  2. 'I myself forgot about these issues and most people are too polite to mention them.'
  3. 'He heard a young comedian being interviewed on the radio the other day and is far too polite to name him.'
  4. 'They also learn that sometimes it's polite to lie to spare the feelings of others.'
  5. 'For instance, if you want your child to have good manners, make sure she sees you being polite to others.'
  6. 'Looks of despair flashed across all of their faces, but to their credit they were too polite to outwardly groan.'
  7. 'I think it's only polite to make the effort in the local language even if everyone does seem to speak English.'
  8. 'He was extremely polite to his opponents and often took up cudgels for them too.'
  9. 'It seemed only polite to say goodnight with a kiss, just between friends.'
  10. 'Even if you think that someone is kind of weird, it is always polite to be nice to them.'
  11. 'the picture outraged polite society'
  12. 'There are still some things that cannot be talked about in polite society.'
  13. 'He may have been born into polite society but Degas was no gentleman painter.'
  14. 'But lay into others and you should prepare to be visited by the vengeance of polite society.'
  15. 'It took my mum to point out that Botox is now fully integrated into polite society.'
  16. 'In this world she expresses sides to her character that struggle for oxygen in polite society.'
  17. 'The musical life of polite European society was a different world altogether.'
  18. 'In short, he has made an asset from features others find a hindrance to acceptance in polite society.'

Definitions

1. showing good manners toward others, as in behavior, speech, etc.; courteous; civil: a polite reply.

2. refined or cultured: polite society.

3. of a refined or elegant kind: polite learning.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be polite to people."

"places can be polite in contacts."

"people can be polite with visitors."

"people can be polite with hosts."

"people can be polite to types."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English (in the Latin sense): from Latin politus ‘polished, made smooth’, past participle of polire.