Adjective "pitiable" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈpɪtɪəb(ə)l/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Deserving or arousing pity.
  1. 'The family of the deceased Avtar Singh is in a very pitiable condition.'
  2. 'If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men the most pitiable.'
  3. 'To colonists, idiocy was a pitiable and vulnerable condition, one more manifestation of God's diverse creations.'
  4. 'The few lives that I had come across were miserable ones, pitiable creatures who had no hope left to live on with.'
  5. 'The condition of students waiting for their exams is pitiable.'
  6. '"You have done a wonderful job in bringing Vivek's pitiable condition into the limelight.'
  7. 'Of all the survivors, those who came out of death or labour camps were the most pitiable.'
  8. 'But what is pitiable is the condition of the tree.'
  9. 'The bloodshed there, and in Romeo and Juliet could be called calamitous, but it was not tragically pitiable.'
  10. 'He, despite these daughterly attentions, is perceived by the Colonel to be in ‘a condition of pitiable infirmity’.'
Contemptibly poor or small.
  1. 'It is pertinent to mention the condition of State finances that are in a pitiable condition.'
  2. 'Lamenting her partner's pitiable dancing, one of the female characters pleas for a real dancer, and her call is answered by an immodest Balthasar decked out in what appears to be a flashy 1980s-style suit.'

Definitions

1. evoking or deserving pity; lamentable: pitiable, homeless children.

2. evoking or deserving contemptuous pity; miserable; contemptible: a pitiable lack of character.

More examples(as adjective)

"conditions can be pitiable."

"weaknesses can be pitiable."

"victims can be pitiable."

"people can be pitiable."

"objects can be pitiable."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French piteable, from piteer ‘to pity’.