Adjective "pirated" definition and examples

(Pirated may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈpʌɪrət/

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Definitions and examples

noun

A person who attacks and robs ships at sea.
  1. 'Like I was a pirate on the sea again, with everything right.'
  2. 'Just then four other pirate ships began to approach them.'
  3. 'The tugboat, carrying eight Japanese and six Filipino crew members, was attacked by armed pirates.'
  4. 'Cynis and Reciler watched as the corvettes made short work of the pirate vessels.'
  5. 'Pearl scurried about the deck, searching the pirate crew to find the captain.'
  6. 'Then together we will be the most fearsome pirates on the sea.'
  7. 'The ship was named for an infamous pirate from the eighteenth century.'
  8. 'Last year, Johnny Depp played a pirate sailing the high seas.'
  9. 'Sikh soldiers and British forces were deployed when rebels and pirates attacked colonial interests.'
  10. 'The notorious pirate who sailed the seven seas without once being caught!'
  11. as modifier 'pirate recordings'
  12. 'Microsoft has busted a group of suspected Scottish software pirates and seized kit worth more than £3 million.'
  13. 'However pirate copies of Windows and Office can be obtained for $4.'
  14. 'The law was drawn up to target professional pirates, criminals and counterfeiters who make copies of goods such as football shirts or CDs.'
  15. 'With some trial and error a software pirate can sit and generate product keys until one is found to be working.'
  16. 'Music internet pirates, Craig reminds us, are devious little monkeys.'
  17. 'Some become music pirates just to do something illegal, something different.'
  18. 'Bait and BSA formed a workgroup for reaching consent on the procedures and the police checks of suspected software pirates.'
  19. 'But there is such a large margin of error for these Chinatown pirate DVDs.'
  20. 'He rightly points out that China is only paying lip service to cracking down on counterfeiters and copyright pirates.'
  21. 'If this was a first time offence, convicted software pirates are liable to fines up to $5,200 or two years in jail.'
  22. 'You could - in theory - be prosecuted for running a pirate radio station.'
  23. 'If an application to secure a full-time licence is successful, organisers of Wharfedale FM plan to develop it along the lines of the old pirate radio stations.'
  24. 'The dismantling of a pirate radio station by police was today hailed as a ‘giant step forward’ by Southend's environment chief.'
  25. 'The pirate radio's broadcasts reached listeners as far away as Germany, France, Switzerland, Britain and the Netherlands.'
  26. 'I now have the chance to broadcast from a ship in the way those radio pirates did!'
  27. 'You got your start in radio as a pirate broadcaster.'
  28. 'An edited version later broadcast on the then pirate radio station Radio Kilkenny resulted in a strong protest from Jim Gibbons and his family.'
  29. 'So what is it that defines a pirate radio station?'
  30. 'These were used to find people with wireless sets but without licences - and to keep an ear open for pirate radio broadcasts too.'
  31. 'Originally put together to sound like a pirate radio broadcast, listening to it now it's like a little time machine.'

verb

Use or reproduce (another's work) for profit without permission, usually in contravention of patent or copyright.
  1. 'Document 18 has heavy penalties for people who purchase or sell pirated software.'
  2. 'He said the conviction was the first he knew of involving a foreigner selling pirated DVDs.'
  3. '"It doesn't allow people to pirate music, " Hammerton said.'
  4. 'Have you heard of anyone having pirated CD's confiscated at customs?'
  5. 'But copyright law did not apply internationally, which meant publishers overseas were free to pirate his works.'
  6. 'There is no color to it, and it seems to have been mastered from an old VHS home video tape pirated from the front row.'
  7. 'Pirated copies of the latest Harry Potter are all over the city.'
  8. 'The DMCA assumes that the only reason to do any of this work is to pirate copyrighted works.'
  9. 'Now, that is because they're trying to prevent people from pirating the movie.'
  10. 'Firstly, with the emergence of DVDs and pirated VCDs, not many film buffs visit theatres anymore.'
Rob or plunder (a ship)
  1. 'Then we are going to have to pirate every dead ship we come across for a long while.'

More definitions

1. a person who robs or commits illegal violence at sea or on the shores of the sea.

2. a ship used by such persons.

3. any plunderer, predator, etc.: confidence men, slumlords, and other pirates.

4. a person who uses or reproduces the work or invention of another without authorization.

5. Also called pirate stream. Geology. a stream that diverts into its own flow the headwaters of another stream, river, etc. verb (used with object), pirated, pirating.

6. to commit piracy upon;

More examples(as adjective)

"softwares can be pirated."

"goodses can be pirated."

"people/places/organizations can be pirated."

"discs can be pirated."

"copies can be pirated."

More examples++

Origin

(pirate)Middle English: from Latin pirata, from Greek peiratēs, from peirein ‘to attempt, attack’ (from peira ‘an attempt’).