Adjective "oleaginous" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˌəʊlɪˈadʒɪnəs/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Rich in, covered with, or producing oil; oily.
  1. 'And who can forget those 60s ads where merry bands of nymphomaniacs roamed the streets seeking the tell-tale oleaginous glint of a man who had just applied Brylcreem - ‘Use more only if you dare!’'
  2. '‘Chalky’ feels like spending time becalmed in an oleaginous ocean, noxious gas clouds occasionally swirling round in the dim light.'
Exaggeratedly and distastefully complimentary; obsequious.
  1. 'Some of his more recent panegyrics to the ‘British dream’ emerge curdled and oleaginous.'
  2. 'Naturally, the oleaginous Gazoo publisher played down rumours that he might be seeking the no-hope gig.'
  3. 'A scruffy soldier takes the stage, hired to appear by the oleaginous host.'
  4. '‘My dears,’ he crooned, in a soft, oleaginous tone, ‘I want you to come with me tomorrow on an ocean adventure.’'
  5. 'In his review the other week, he wrote ‘I'm not going to name our guests,’ but went on to observe that, ‘the owner made an oleaginous, starstruck fool of himself’.'
  6. 'I'm not going to name our guests, because I don't want them to be associated with this place, and because a man whom I assume was the owner made such an oleaginous, starstruck fool of himself.'
  7. 'Philip was a sly and somewhat oleaginous character but also an effective, resolute, and respected king.'
  8. 'The first, a likeable and oleaginous drunk of around fifty, was all.'
  9. 'With some help from Mario whom even as a stripling I found pretty oleaginous, the French menu was interpreted.'
  10. 'Perry is an architect who is bidding for a contract with an oleaginous millionaire.'
  11. 'However, there was a downside to paying repeated homage to this oleaginous expatriate.'

Definitions

1. having the nature or qualities of oil.

2. containing oil.

3. producing oil.

4. unctuous; fawning; smarmy.

More examples(as adjective)

"registrars can be oleaginous."

Origin

Late Middle English: from French oléagineux, from Latin oleaginus ‘of the olive tree’, from oleum ‘oil’.