Adjective "odious" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈəʊdɪəs/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Extremely unpleasant; repulsive.
  1. 'odious hypocrisy'
  2. 'Last Thursday, the odious Shepherd announced that the Newcastle job was one of the ‘top eight’ in the world.'
  3. 'But then I remember that their agendas are sometimes odious and even dangerous.'
  4. 'One result of last night's odious affair is certain to be earlier kick-offs for future fixtures between Rangers and Aberdeen.'
  5. 'Ireland's wildlife is too precious to be destroyed by those who are nothing less than odious countryside terrorists.'
  6. 'They stepped through the low front door and found that inside the house was as vile, odious and squalid as its owner.'
  7. 'As tragic events unfolded in Europe, Luce ran his thriving magazine empire with an odious tilt.'
  8. 'Comparisons between San Gimignano and New York are not odious.'
  9. 'I have to engage the passions of others by painting him as vicious or odious or depraved: hateful in general.'
  10. 'At the same time, the odious extremism at the other end of the spectrum, in the shape of the BNP vote elsewhere, has also strengthened.'
  11. 'This carping is an odious theme we hear constantly from Angela.'

Definitions

1. deserving or causing hatred; hateful; detestable.

2. highly offensive; repugnant; disgusting.

More examples(as adjective)

"feedings can be odious as seals."

"feedings can be odious as minks."

"prisoners can be odious to people."

"people can be odious as people."

"dissents can be odious in crickets."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French odieus, from Latin odiosus, from odium ‘hatred’.