Adjective "occupied" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈɒkjʊpʌɪd/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of a building, seat, etc.) being used by someone.
  1. 'When Harold would try to eject them from various occupied premises all over campus, they would tell him to "stop pimping for the administration."'
  2. 'Meanwhile, he said he was disappointed by the level of turn-out, which saw less than a dozen seats occupied by members of the public.'
  3. 'The main part of the divided house is now occupied by another Irishman.'
  4. 'In 1565 it passed to the Fowler family, and in 1644, during the Civil War, the occupied monastic buildings were besieged and captured by Parliamentarian forces under Sir Thomas Myddelton.'
  5. 'On Saturday, the plant remained occupied.'
  6. 'With this de facto recognition of squatting, the word quickly came to mean simply that the tenurial status of the occupied land remained unresolved.'
  7. 'Subsequent migrants, finding that the big islands were occupied, settled on the outlying islands, most of which are coral outliers.'
  8. 'In many mosques, only a small portion is left for offering prayers and all the remaining portions are occupied.'
Busy and active.
  1. 'With nearly 500 staff and 377 rooms, the four-star hotel certainly keeps him occupied.'
  2. 'William only nodded, barely registering parts of the discussion in his mind, which was occupied elsewhere.'
  3. 'Entertainers have been brought in and extra activities arranged in a bid to keep the elderly residents occupied.'
  4. 'There will be more pics of my life posted, but please be patient, when I am less occupied, I am sure to entertain you with every details of my life.'
  5. 'For psychiatrists, it offers enough material to keep them occupied for months.'
  6. 'I could, for instance, argue that work is keeping me more than occupied.'
  7. 'I'm gonna look into trip routes and travel times today, and plan out a tentative first month schedule to keep myself occupied.'
(of a place, especially a country) taken control of by military conquest or settlement.
  1. 'A Royal Marines Commando from an heroic World War II raid on occupied France has returned to the area where he made his epic overland escape.'
  2. 'And in Palestine, the first local elections for some years in the occupied West Bank have produced some bad news for Israel.'
  3. 'The most obvious exclusion, which was not foreseen by the early Zionists, is the status of the Palestinians in the occupied territories.'
  4. 'The present writer had been implicated during the war, since he had been dealing with the partisans in occupied Europe, amongst these the partisans of Yugoslavia.'
  5. 'But legally, Kosovo was not incorporated into the Serbian kingdom in 1912; it remained occupied territory until some time after 1918.'
  6. 'What part was played by the perpetrators across occupied Europe?'
  7. 'The teenager honed his craft singing in occupied Germany with the US Army's 314th Infantry Orchestra.'
  8. 'In December 46 per cent of the prisoners held in occupied Poland and in the Reich Commissariat in the Ukraine died, for example.'
  9. 'Already, prior to the latest crisis, unemployment of Palestinians in the occupied territories stood at 50 percent.'

Definitions

1. to take or fill up (space, time, etc.): I occupied my evenings reading novels.

2. to engage or employ the mind, energy, or attention of: Occupy the children with a game while I prepare dinner.

3. to be a resident or tenant of; dwell in: We occupied the same house for 20 years.

4. to hold (a position, office, etc.).

5. to take possession and control of (a place), as by military invasion.

6. (usually initial capital letter) to partici

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be occupied in things."

"houses can be occupied by people."

"states can be occupied with things."

"settlements can be occupied in wars."

"people can be occupied in/at/on days."

More examples++

Origin

(occupy)