Adjective "obscene" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/əbˈsiːn/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of the portrayal or description of sexual matters) offensive or disgusting by accepted standards of morality and decency.
  1. 'Football chants are cruel, obscene, offensive, sometimes downright sick and often very funny.'
  2. 'They had already beaten up and name-called other boys from his school, and subjected girls to obscene sexual innuendo.'
  3. 'This poem uses obscene words to describe obscene acts and obscene attitudes.'
  4. 'At that moment, they noticed I was watching them and greeted me with a tirade of foul language and obscene gestures.'
  5. 'It is the voyeur in the audience who is the reason for offensive and obscene scenes in films.'
  6. 'They said the film was obscene and vulgar and showed women in a poor light.'
  7. 'It may be said that this movie is crude, profane, and even obscene at times - but so is war.'
  8. 'If someone leaves a comment, it appears as written unless the comment is obscene or vulgar.'
  9. 'Any local band can apply to play a set on stage, but organisers are warning acts that obscene lyrics and lewd behaviour are out of the question.'
  10. 'Thereafter, colonial censors turned their attention more closely to stamping out obscene literature.'
  11. 'using animals' skins for fur coats is obscene'
  12. 'It becomes the vehicle for corporate branding of the most vulgar sort and it encourages waste on an obscene scale.'
  13. 'Few people today would describe the First World War as anything other than an obscene slaughter.'
  14. 'The obscene inequalities of wealth dividing rich and poor nations must be reduced.'

Definitions

1. offensive to morality or decency; indecent; depraved: obscene language.

2. causing uncontrolled sexual desire.

3. abominable; disgusting; repulsive.

More examples(as adjective)

"magazines can be obscene in places."

"gestures can be obscene."

"materials can be obscene."

"acts can be obscene."

"publications can be obscene."

More examples++

Origin

Late 16th century: from French obscène or Latin obscaenus ‘ill-omened or abominable’.