Adjective "meritocracy" definition and examples

(Meritocracy may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˌmɛrɪˈtɒkrəsi/

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Definitions and examples

noun

Government or the holding of power by people selected according to merit.
  1. 'Allied to the control with which candidate selection lists are drawn up, it seems the Party is letting us slip into its own form of meritocracy, badly dressed up as democracy.'
  2. 'Given the names initially under consideration and the ones denied an airing, it is obvious that political unions rather than meritocracy still carry the greater weight.'
  3. 'He says Republicans believe in meritocracy and recognise those with good ideas.'
  4. 'He did his best, offering equal citizenship, collective solidarity, meritocracy and mutual respect as his core Party values.'
  5. 'However, it will not alter the arrogance and meritocracy that is inherent in party politics.'
  6. 'Many liberal democracies, Britain included, justify wide disparities in the income levels of the rich and poor in terms of a doctrine of meritocracy.'
  7. 'The political system, however, is not a meritocracy in the same sense.'
  8. 'A spokesman for the Singapore government said recently: ‘We are doing it in the interests of meritocracy, transparency and objectivity.’'
  9. 'While Prussia had used nationalism to overcome France's advantage in recruiting, it found that adopting a meritocracy was more difficult.'
  10. 'It's the end of meritocracy, let alone democracy.'
  11. 'Britain is a meritocracy, and everyone with skill and imagination may aspire to reach the highest level'
  12. 'I believe in a society that is a meritocracy, and I believe this is worth working for.'
  13. 'Who was the UK General in the First World War who rose from the ranks - dispelling the idea that Edwardian Britain wasn't a meritocracy?'
  14. '‘You have no choice but to have a complete meritocracy and have the competition of the best ideas, best talents and the best people regardless of their backgrounds,’ Yang said.'
  15. '‘The industry became more of a meritocracy,’ says Kurt Cerulli of Boston's Cerulli Associates Inc.'
  16. 'Well at least we don't live in a meritocracy that says that people with degrees should earn more than minimum wage.'
  17. 'Whether you live in a feudal system or a meritocracy, the only ambitions worth having are for your soul.'
  18. 'Equality of opportunity is then either a means to meritocracy or partly constitutive of it.'
  19. 'He built a multiracial meritocracy that insists on tolerance, lawfulness and freedom from crime.'
  20. 'He emphasized that equality in America also means meritocracy, a stress on equality of opportunity among individuals regardless of social origins.'
  21. 'The problem with Liang's novels is that it is a rigid meritocracy - people are graded on their martial art skills, and when a superior fighter encounters an inferior fighter, the outcome is always the same.'
  22. 'the relentless advance of the meritocracy'
  23. 'However, they embrace the meritocracies of education and athletics, two pursuits that have come to be associated especially, though not exclusively, with American middle-class culture.'
  24. 'I may no longer be the communist of my youth, but I do believe in a meritocracy where people can get on in life thanks to their own efforts.'
  25. 'Sure, we spend billions each year on college sports but we are willing to give all that up for an academic meritocracy based upon infallible test scores.'
  26. 'The company was a true meritocracy where a guy with a bit of chutzpah, a common touch and a love of money could go a long way.'
  27. 'The campaign is also backed by several millionaires whose aim is to develop a meritocracy in British society.'
  28. 'We have a meritocracy of money in which good public education is passed on from one generation to the next.'
  29. 'The governing class, defended as a meritocracy, resembles nothing more than the Chinese mandarinate.'
  30. 'De Bottan's comparison between Aristocracies and meritocracies does indeed seem facile if you look at it as the be-all and end-all of happiness - but its not if you remember its context.'
  31. 'The founder of the National Outdoor Leadership School, proposed a meritocracy, giving priority to those best educated in wilderness skills.'
  32. 'Some people think a meritocracy would reward literary novelists more than those who write formula romances.'

More definitions

1. an elite group of people whose progress is based on ability and talent rather than on class privilege or wealth.

2. a system in which such persons are rewarded and advanced: The dean believes the educational system should be a meritocracy.

3. leadership by able and talented persons.

More examples(as adjective)

"controversies can be meritocracy."