Adjective "lupine" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈluːpʌɪn/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Of, like, or relating to a wolf or wolves.
  1. 'They argued that the lupine fantasy could be seen as a fundamental challenge to Western notions of subjectivity.'
  2. 'Ogre emerged sporting a large lupine mask, flanked by Key on a synth riser, a live drummer and a guitarist wielding a double-necked axe straight out of a Thor video.'
  3. 'Timis, the alpha bitch in her pack, was a savvy survivor, and she opened his eyes to the range of lupine resourcefulness in Romania.'
  4. 'When a vampire bites a werewolf, the vampire and wolf will die, because lupine blood is undrinkable, and the werewolf has a nasty reaction to the vampire's fangs.'
  5. 'The girls get their costumes ripped off by the lupine guy in the white jacket and ripped jeans.'
  6. 'He scowled at the amount of blood decorating the floor in front of the wolf and then roughly grabbed the back of the lupine captain's head.'
  7. 'The latter was fiercely jealous, and if Parsons showed obvious affection toward someone, Patsy howled as though she were calling upon all her lupine ancestors to come forth and carry off the intruder.'
  8. 'Arranged in concentric circles, the houses of The Den were well-distanced from each other, perhaps owing to the werewolves' lupine need for space to run around in.'
  9. 'With media attention hitting fever pitch, a strangely lupine man called Wolf decides to take up the hunt, interrupting Dusty's incompetent press conference.'
  10. 'It is striking to reflect upon how overwhelmingly male the cast is: every character in the text, excluding the husband in his lupine form and the wife, is a man.'

Definitions

1. any of numerous plants belonging to the genus Lupinus, of the legume family, as L. albus (white lupine) of Europe, bearing edible seeds, or L. perennis, of the eastern U.S., having tall, dense clusters of blue, pink, or white flowers.

More examples(as adjective)

"smiles can be lupine."

Origin

(lupine)Mid 17th century: from Latin lupinus, from lupus ‘wolf’.