Adjective "loyal" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈlɔɪəl/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Giving or showing firm and constant support or allegiance to a person or institution.
  1. 'loyal service'
  2. 'Everyone complains about the state of education, and yet most people remain fiercely loyal to their local schools.'
  3. 'Followers electing a king were also proclaiming themselves as his loyal supporters.'
  4. 'Then imagine if those titles are remakes of classic fighting games that have extremely loyal followings.'
  5. 'He had been fiercely loyal to the king and had a promising future in the army.'
  6. 'They'll capture the attention of their loyal fanbase, without any effort.'
  7. 'In addition, users can attract and retain more loyal customers and reduce operating costs.'
  8. 'The eastern army were seasoned soldiers, loyal to the crown.'
  9. 'People remember where they learn new information, and that builds a loyal following.'
  10. 'Do you think we'd be able to take on soldiers loyal to a warlord?'
  11. 'The rest are mostly Afghan soldiers loyal to the interim government.'

Definitions

1. faithful to one's sovereign, government, or state: a loyal subject.

2. faithful to one's oath, commitments, or obligations: to be loyal to a vow.

3. faithful to any leader, party, or cause, or to any person or thing conceived as deserving fidelity: a loyal friend.

4. characterized by or showing faithfulness to commitments, vows, allegiance, obligations, etc.: loyal conduct.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be loyal to people."

"rebels can be loyal to leaders."

"people can be loyal to places."

"communists can be loyal to people."

"people can be loyal to governments."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French, via Old French loial from Latin legalis (see legal).