Adjective "lemon" definition and examples

(Lemon may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈlɛmən/

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Definitions and examples

noun

A pale yellow oval citrus fruit with thick skin and fragrant, acidic juice.
  1. mass noun 'garnish with a slice of lemon'
  2. 'When cool, add the juice of two lemons and the reserved liquid and make up the volume to 4 ½ litres.'
  3. 'Limes nearly always yield more juice than lemons because although they are smaller, they have thinner skins and finer papery segments within.'
  4. 'Carefully fold in the avocado with the lemon juice and some of the herbs.'
  5. 'At every vegetable market in North Africa, and now also in the south of France, there are stalls laden with huge piles of soft lemons, oozing with juice, next to several varieties of olives.'
  6. 'There, they picked raspberries, walnuts, lemons and pears.'
  7. 'Almonds, plums, apples, cherries, and lemons are enjoyed in many households fresh off the trees in family gardens.'
  8. 'Tucuman is the country's largest producer of sugar cane and lemons.'
  9. 'Davenport squeezes the juice from several lemons into water and adds the rinds and boils the liquid until the water starts turning brown.'
  10. 'If you can find a hole where ants are entering the house, squeeze the juice of a lemon in the hole or crack.'
  11. 'When the bubbles start to look brown around the edges, squeeze in lemon juice from the cut lemons.'
  12. 'Crush the avocado with the lemon juice, salt and pepper, and spread thickly on the bread.'
  13. 'Squeeze in the juice from both lemons, and salt and pepper to taste.'
  14. 'a port and lemon'
  15. 'He reached behind him, turning slightly, and produced a cup of steaming, plain tea with honey and lemon.'
  16. 'No one made me hot lemon drinks or brought me books to read, or showed the slightest sign of sympathy.'
  17. 'Now take the lime juice out of the drink and substitute lemon juice.'
  18. 'One reader wrote asking why lemon juice makes tea go lighter in colour.'
  19. 'Jay ordered three hot dogs and two cups of iced lemon tea.'
  20. 'It was really easy to drink, because I put lemon juice and honey and a little bit of salt into each one.'
  21. 'I was told to go home and drink hot lemon because all I had was the common cold.'
  22. 'When it is warmer, people consume plenty of lemon juice, and drinks made from crushed petals of roses and sugar, instead.'
  23. 'The average day takes in about four to five hours walking in total, regularly stopping in remote villages for lemon tea, to visit temples and chat to the local people.'
  24. 'Adele looked at her mug of lemon tea, guilt suddenly sweeping over her.'
The evergreen citrus tree which produces lemons, widely cultivated in warm climates.
  1. 'The lemon tree didn't bear fruit, so he tied lemons to the branches.'
  2. 'Bart and his friends march on Shelbyville when Springfield's lemon tree is stolen by a gang of children from across the border.'
  3. 'Planted with lemon trees in warmer months and clipped hollies for the rest of the year, they seem to glow an ultramarine colour even in overcast conditions, and look even more dramatic when lit at night.'
  4. 'Trees include the Ash, palm, laurel tree, the myrrh tree, frankincense, the cane tree or plant, the cedar, heletrepion, the orange and lemon tree.'
  5. 'One of the great things about this flat is the large lemon tree which has its roots on the neighbour's side of the fence, but decides to bear most of its fruit on ours.'
  6. 'When Celia Fiennes visited it in 1698 it had its own water supply and ‘an abundance of people of quality’, who took walks in the abbey gardens, amongst orange and lemon trees, hollies, myrtles, and aloes.'
  7. 'I would sit in my rather dim, hot room with the scent from the lemon tree coming through the window, feverishly going through the same issues over and over again.'
  8. 'Try 6 acres of gardens with olive trees, lemon trees and chestnut trees.'
  9. 'I keep raving about our magical lemon tree but I keep forgetting to bring any of its produce to her.'
  10. 'The room was silent once more, except for Bart and Milhouse discussing a lemon tree on the television.'
A pale yellow colour.
  1. 'Other fruit colours such as spearmint, lemon and blue are also popular.'
  2. 'Huge blocks of pale turquoise were set off by strips of lemon yellow hems or belts, and oversized rainbow stripes crisscrossed the body on dresses and shell tops.'
  3. 'From cream to beige to peach and lemon yellow, the range comes in several colours apart from the new shade mint.'
  4. 'They bloom in a range of colors from bright lemon yellow to a deep golden color, and there is also a lovely pink variety.'
  5. 'Its colour scheme is soft lemon, which complements the stained timber floor.'
  6. 'Before she could get the chance to protest, he pulled her outside and pulled out the folded lemon yellow paper.'
  7. 'The Marigold erecta, in orange, lemon, golden yellow and a rare white, is a good potted plant.'
  8. 'The bridesmaids were Sharon Power, Rachel Lenihan and Fiona O'Loughlin and they wore dresses with gold brocade bodice and lemon skirt.'
  9. 'A houndstooth wool anchored the season, with touches of dusty rose and pale lemon.'
  10. 'For those wanting something more bright, there are colours like orange, green, and lemon.'
An unsatisfactory or feeble person or thing.
  1. 'As a result you are stuck holding some real lemons - and the prospect of widespread industrial chaos - as we move into an election year.'

More definitions

1. the yellowish, acid fruit of a subtropical citrus tree, Citrus limon.

2. the tree itself.

3. lemon yellow.

4. Informal. a person or thing that proves to be defective, imperfect, or unsatisfactory; dud: His car turned out to be a lemon. adjective

5. made of or with lemon.

6. having the color, taste, or odor of lemon.

More examples(as adjective)

"rinds can be lemon."

"juices can be lemon."

"groves can be lemon."

"cooks can be lemon."

"trees can be lemon."

More examples++

Origin

Middle English: via Old French limon (in modern French denoting a lime) from Arabic līmūn (a collective term for fruits of this kind); compare with lime.