Adjective "learned" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈləːnɪd/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of a person) having acquired much knowledge through study.
  1. 'It should not be that he fails to consult learned people.'
  2. 'It remains for our learned people to resolve, as was done by Luther, Bacon and Erasamus, Rabelais and Montaigne.'
  3. 'The learned people of our faith tell us that is the best place to be.'
  4. 'The rest of us (who are not learned scholars) can only infer, deduce and feel His Hand.'
  5. 'One level of reading was for the lay public while another was for learned scholars.'
  6. 'They are very hospitable to learned and well-traveled people, as they love to learn new things from them.'
  7. 'And he was learned and perspicacious enough to see that the rigidity which the old Labour party embraced would entail its own reaction.'
  8. 'The ideal would be to study those very same books under the auspices of a learned teacher.'
  9. 'Publication of papers in learned journals is an intrinsic and inevitable component of doing science.'
  10. 'A major chunk of journals in biomedical sciences is brought out by learned societies.'
  11. 'Graaf's efforts introduced Leeuwenhoek to the most important learned society of the time.'
  12. 'Data from scientists in the field were published in learned society journals.'
  13. 'I, by the bright light of noon, would like to reveal the most learned and erudite of my studies.'
  14. 'Articles about democracy appeared in learned journals, books and other academic writings.'
  15. 'Other specialist libraries are maintained by federal and state departments and agencies, and by learned and professional societies.'
  16. 'Why, in two of her lectures, does she discuss Kafka's ape, dressed up to make a speech to a learned society, and forced to speak their language?'
  17. 'He was a learned Scholar of the Bible, the Zora and the Torah.'
  18. 'He began fifty years ago as a Shakespeare scholar, with a learned and still necessary edition of The Tempest.'
  19. 'my learned friend'
  20. 'Your Honour, we would take issue with my learned friend on that point.'
  21. 'Could I go for the moment to section 30B, which is behind our learned friend the appellant's materials.'
  22. 'Your Honours, my learned junior has provided some notes in answer to some questions.'
  23. 'I did not do the trial, your Honour, my learned junior did.'
  24. 'Here, if one listens to the submissions of our learned friend, it is though the prosecutor at the sentencing hearing did not err.'
  25. 'There is no identical phrase in any of the statutes that are included in the booklet submitted by my learned friends.'
  26. 'The learned trial judge took the view that he is a very dangerous character.'
  27. 'However, the finding of the learned trial judge was not that at all.'
  28. 'No doubt our learned friends will develop how it is said that description of the approach to construction affects the matter.'
  29. 'My learned colleague tells me they have been providing that care for 70 years.'

Definitions

1. having much knowledge; scholarly; erudite: learned professors.

2. connected or involved with the pursuit of knowledge, especially of a scholarly nature: a learned journal.

3. of or showing learning or knowledge; well-informed: learned in the ways of the world.

4. acquired by experience, study, etc.: learned behavior.

More examples(as adjective)

"thatands can be learned about rests."

"thatands can be learned about politicses."

"people can be learned from managers."

"people can be learned by spectacles."

"friends can be learned."

More examples++

Origin

Middle English: from learn, in the sense ‘teach’.