Adjective "learn" definition and examples

(Learn may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ləːn/

Definitions and examples

verb

Gain or acquire knowledge of or skill in (something) by study, experience, or being taught.
  1. with infinitive 'she is learning to play the piano'
  2. 'The gifted apprentice attaches himself early to a wise teacher, learning the craft at his hands, six or eight hours a day, every day of the week.'
  3. 'Everyone gets more or less that same elementary education, learning basic history and to read and to do basic math.'
  4. 'You mentioned that you could not be aware while learning a foreign language.'
  5. 'For him, the key to settling successfully in a foreign culture is not just learning the language.'
  6. 'He also observed the students learning an aversion to investigating patients' social and psychological problems.'
  7. 'Here, a group of children are busy learning the basics of education these days through a theatre workshop.'
  8. 'Attitudes are learnt through observation of those in relative power or seniority.'
  9. 'Their author has evolved into a prose sophisticate, and clearly learnt some important lessons along the way.'
  10. 'Neither does one want to waste time learning skills and information which will soon be as useless as hats for silt.'
  11. 'She was learning American thought and culture without any criticism.'
  12. 'I'd learned too many grim poems in school'
  13. 'Well, I think part of the problem is that the students are not learning and retaining the material.'
  14. 'Name by name, she learned them so that she could remember them later on when riding.'
  15. 'Many of the chants and songs I learned are soon to fade from campus memory.'
  16. 'Previous studies of bilingual memory have primarily used word lists as materials to be learned.'
  17. 'I haven't, for instance, recommended memorising great swathes of sporting statistics, or learning the eight times tables.'
  18. 'It seems college instruction has moved or is moving back to memorization and rote learning.'
  19. with clause 'I learned that they had eaten already'
  20. 'He said he deleted the names when he learned the report would be made public, as he only had one witness.'
  21. 'It is from him that I learned that liberation movements, revolution, terrorism live in a world of their own and create their own etymology.'
  22. 'His passing last week was learned of with very deep and genuine regret within this community.'
  23. 'Those were the same words a second-in-command had said when learning Jasmine's name three long years ago.'
  24. 'Her family was not consulted, and only learned of her death a month later.'
  25. 'Their grandfather had come to rescue them when he learned of their existence.'
  26. 'He said he was shocked beyond belief when he learned that literacy students were having their course cut.'
  27. 'The Leader of the House is saying that the Minister did not have enough time to discover on what date he learnt a piece of information.'
  28. 'I was unaware of the seriousness of her illness until I learned of her death.'
  29. 'As usual there was a small turn out for the meeting but those who did attend learned a great deal of new information.'
Teach (someone)
  1. with object and infinitive 'we'll have to learn you to milk cows'

More definitions

1. to acquire knowledge of or skill in by study, instruction, or experience: to learn French; to learn to ski.

2. to become informed of or acquainted with; ascertain: to learn the truth.

3. to memorize: He learned the poem so he could recite it at the dinner.

4. to gain (a habit, mannerism, etc.) by experience, exposure to example, or the like; acquire: She learned patience from her father.

5. (of a de

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be learn in/at/on times."

"people can be learn to loves."

"people can be learn to challenges."

"people can be learn of cases."

"people can be learn from sources."

More examples++

Origin

Old English leornian ‘learn’ (in Middle English also ‘teach’), of West Germanic origin; related to German lernen, also to lore.