Adjective "leapfrogged" definition and examples

(Leapfrogged may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈliːpfrɒɡ/

Definitions and examples

noun

A game in which players in turn vault with parted legs over others who are bending down.
  1. 'This game of electoral leapfrog might be in the best interest of individual states, but it's destructive to the national interest.'

verb

Perform such a vault.
  1. 'she leapfrogged into a sales position'
  2. 'This happened because France leapfrogged Scotland after winning their own tournament, the final contest of last season, and gaining 20 points as a result.'
  3. 'For Dublin, most of all, is European, looking to Bonn and Barcelona rather than London, having leapfrogged over us into Euroland with acres of European news dominating the media.'
  4. 'They have leapfrogged the competition through adaptive strategies and ever-better product quality.'
  5. 'A relatively obscure virtualisation system has leapfrogged better-known rivals.'
  6. 'The bait: an opportunity for politicians-in-the-making to leapfrog into lofty party positions.'
  7. 'The massive margin of victory recorded by Bridlington over Bolton Percy in no way reflected their close proximity in the league table where the coastal outfit leapfrogged their opponents after winning by 215 runs.'
  8. 'And two more points over an indifferent Brods side would see them leapfrog the visitors and move within touching distance of leaders Bridlington and York.'
  9. 'City won 2-1 to leapfrog Walsall and move back into 19th spot, still ten points clear of the bottom three.'
  10. 'As a result, the visiting side leapfrogged their opponents to move second in the table.'
  11. 'Actually this was an amazing attempt at leapfrogging everyone.'
  12. 'With the use of uplifting essential oils their metabolisms could be fooled into leapfrogging hibernation, believing they had already arrived in the scent of spring.'
  13. 'Booking online can leapfrog both queuing for lift passes and organising tuition - while providing significant discounts.'
  14. 'In effect, China is leapfrogging the traditional land-line telephone stage of communications development, going directly to mobile phones.'
  15. 'But Goya is one of those artists who we feel speak directly to us, who leapfrogs the centuries to tell us urgent, timeless truths.'
  16. 'Accident victims can now reach hospital in a fraction of the usual time - by leapfrogging traffic jams with the ‘flying angels’.'
  17. 'Deprived of our targeted audience, we started walking south, leapfrogging the police barriers, wondering if they'd play the game until we'd come to the city center about two miles to the south.'
  18. 'Just a matter of months after Dance to the Music, Sly & the Family Stone turned around and delivered Life, a record that leapfrogged over its predecessor in terms of accomplishment and achievement.'
  19. 'In other words it was leapfrogging the old when-to-invest-in-a-new-fab problem by buying additional existing capacity, doubtless at a discount, from a distressed rival.'
  20. 'He points out that in Bulgaria, there is still room for product innovation, but none of the economies have leapfrogged several development stages at once.'

More definitions

1. a game in which players take turns in leaping over another player bent over from the waist.

2. an advance from one place, position, or situation to another without progressing through all or any of the places or stages in between: a leapfrog from bank teller to vice president in one short year. verb (used with object), leapfrogged, leapfrogging.

3. to jump over (a person or thing) in or as if in leapfrog: He leapfrogged the fence to reach the crying child.

4. to move or cause to

More examples(as adjective)

"marks can be leapfrogged."

Origin

(leapfrog)