Adjective "laudatory" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈlɔːdət(ə)ri/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of speech or writing) expressing praise and commendation.
  1. 'Nothing suits her better than bucking her party and getting all those nice laudatory articles about what a maverick she is.'
  2. 'He didn't want his 50th jubilee to be celebrated at all, let alone celebrated with the customary pompous laudatory speeches.'
  3. 'Here's a sampling of laudatory comments culled from the archives.'
  4. 'The inscriptions are replete with complimentary titles and laudatory sentiments and are finely enameled in the purplish gray background characteristic of wares made for him.'
  5. 'I can remember taking particular note of the laudatory comments about him in these publications.'
  6. 'The obituary is highly laudatory, a testimony of praise for a creative artist.'
  7. 'It got very laudatory comments from the commander of the Battalion.'
  8. 'I have even received three laudatory letters from black prisoners, all recounting how they subscribed to the party-faithful line in their youth but have rejected it since.'
  9. 'The laudatory nature of this article was treated with some scepticism by many of the residents.'
  10. 'With one qualified exception they have been laudatory, have commended his integrity, his reliance upon his God, his brilliance as a soldier, his restless energy as head of state.'

Definitions

1. containing or expressing praise: overwhelmed by the speaker's laudatory remarks.

More examples(as adjective)

"letters can be laudatory in descriptions."

"counterparts can be laudatory."

"articles can be laudatory."

"words can be laudatory."

"styles can be laudatory."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 16th century: from late Latin laudatorius, from laudat- ‘praised’, from the verb laudare (see laud).