Adjective "knot" definition and examples

(Knot may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/nɒt/

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Definitions and examples

noun

A fastening made by looping a piece of string, rope, or something similar on itself and tightening it.
  1. figurative 'a complicated knot of racial politics and pride'
  2. 'Why are kids up and down the country dumping their computer games in favour of tying knots in colourful plastic strings?'
  3. 'It is a good idea to tie knots in the rope or cloth about 1 ft. apart, this will provide a more secure climbing surface.'
  4. 'I gritted my teeth as I carefully untied the knot in the ribbon.'
  5. 'He tightened the knot on his tie and brushed an imagined piece of lint off his uniform jacket.'
  6. 'Her hair was twisted in an elaborate knot at the back of her head.'
  7. 'Her fingers trembled, making it even harder to untie the knot.'
  8. 'Immediately, he began to undo the knots of the rope by which she was bound.'
  9. 'She'd already gotten two of the knots undone, and she was sure it was just a matter of time before she was free.'
  10. 'Jodi began to pull at the remaining knots in the rope that tied her other hand.'
  11. 'I washed my face and hands and braided my hair in a tight knot at the nape of my neck.'
  12. 'These are the names of particular kinds of rope knots.'
  13. 'To construct Pieranski's knot, you fold a circular loop of rope and tie two multiple overhand knots in it.'
  14. 'Rebecca came and stood behind him watching with great pleasure as he mastered the perfect knot.'
A tangled mass in something such as hair or wool.
  1. 'I pulled her hair behind her and gently began to pull the comb through the knots in her hair.'
  2. 'Her hair was tangled in knots, she was pale, and her eyes were bloodshot.'
  3. 'She dragged the brush through her daughter's long hair, untangling knots as she went.'
  4. 'Reaching for a silver comb, Luke sighed once more and started pulling the knots out of his hair.'
  5. 'It took me half an hour to brush the wet knots out of my hair.'
  6. 'It is impossible to knit from a skein without getting the wool in a knot.'
  7. 'His brown hair was an unruly mass of tangles and knots.'
  8. 'I smiled faintly and got off of the bed, shrinking away from him and pulling my hand through the knots in my hair.'
  9. 'The comb is specially designed to cut through knots and tangles and much less time is spent in brushing and combing your Shih Tzu.'
  10. 'She stood behind Freya, and brushed carefully through her dark hair, gently easing out the tangles and knots.'
A knob, protuberance, or node in a stem, branch, or root.
  1. 'Nematodes are microscopic roundworms that attack plant roots and cause large knots.'
  2. 'Her knife caught on a knot, and she scowled at the branch.'
  3. 'It was a large majestic oak tree, and every knot and burl on it had a memory for me.'
  4. '‘Every knot on every log that goes out of here is trimmed flush, whether it is a saw log or a pulp log,’ he explains.'
  5. 'I couldn't get a shillelagh, so I used a cane with knots in it instead.'
  6. 'I was cutting some boards and hit a knot in the wood, and the saw kicked back and cut my leg.'
  7. 'Root-knot nematodes cause distinct knots or galls on the roots.'
  8. 'One piece of wood may be a very simple object, yet another piece may be entirely different and very complex, especially around a burl or knot.'
  9. 'Daniel ran a hand through his hair and stared at the cedar desk, absently tracing a knot in the wood with his finger.'
  10. 'I squeeze her muscles once more, surprised at how the knot has completely vanished.'
  11. 'To round off the day, it's time for that rehydrating massage, which not only moisturises the body but also gets out the last few knots of tension.'
  12. 'I smacked my arm into a doorknob really hard, and there's a knot in the muscle of the forearm now.'
  13. 'He was sitting up with his back to her for now, one hand rubbing the newly formed knot on his head and the other holding the knife he had used to cut the tape earlier.'
  14. 'From a seated position, curl one dumbbell up, feeling the muscles in your arm bunch up in a strong, searing knot as you reach the top and pause.'
An unpleasant feeling of tightness or tension in a part of the body.
  1. 'His stomach tightens in a knot as he stumbles down the hall towards his bedroom.'
  2. 'Lynn paused, feeling the knot starting to tighten again in her stomach.'
  3. 'I woke up this morning with a knot of excitement and anticipation nestling comfortably in my stomach.'
  4. 'Peter gulped down a tense, hard knot that had formed in the back of his throat.'
  5. 'At eleven o'clock she was knocking on his door, her stomach tied in a knot and her hands shaking slightly.'
  6. 'She felt rooted to the spot, her disappointment and fear a cold, hard knot in the pit of her stomach.'
  7. 'She felt a tight knot in her stomach - had she slept through an attack?'
  8. 'He glared at me and I felt a tight knot in my stomach.'
  9. 'Despite his air of confidence, Lipton's stomach was in knots, hard and cold.'
  10. 'She pulled herself into a ball on her bed, her misery forming a hard knot in her heart.'
A small tightly packed group of people.
  1. 'A knot of demonstrators in black wore red bandanas over their faces.'
  2. 'They stop and chat to small knots of curious residents.'
  3. 'After a short time they came across a knot of people gathered outside a church.'
  4. 'A small knot of men standing in front of J.R.'s split in two to get out of our way, laughing at us and pointing.'
  5. 'On the other hand, home economics was virtually empty, with Miss Orton teaching a small knot of girls made to do the cookery class by their parents.'
  6. 'I only half-listened while I scanned the knot of protesters for anyone familiar.'
  7. 'A knot of people gathered in Main Street to watch the waters slowly begin to rise again.'
  8. 'A small knot of enthusiasts were invited up to the woods around Sonning Common to take a look.'
  9. 'Inside was a small knot of people, eagerly witnessing a one-hour live demonstration of Indian music and dance.'
  10. 'There was a knot of soldiers gathered around a white lump at the foot of a small cliff.'
A unit of speed equivalent to one nautical mile per hour, used especially of ships, aircraft, or winds.
  1. 'The rescue went without incident, although conditions were difficult - there was a four-metre swell and winds of 20 knots.'
  2. 'Two 90 horsepower engines will give it a cruising speed of 15 knots and a range of 400 miles.'
  3. 'The propulsion system provides a maximum submerged speed of 33 knots and a surface speed of 10 knots.'
  4. 'The area had been hit by heavy rainstorms with wind speeds of about 10 knots per hour, which had caused the sea level to rise by about 1.5 meters.'
  5. 'Knox-Johnston was alone at sea for an incredible 313 days, averaging just 3.39 knots round the globe.'
  6. 'On the ocean surface, its normal cruising speed is about 12 knots, but it is capable of attaining 20 knots in short bursts.'
  7. 'The single-seat biplane had a top speed of 108 knots per hour.'
  8. 'The 81-metre ship is powered by two 12-cylinder diesel engines, and has a top speed of about 18 knots.'
  9. 'The maximum ship speed is 30 knots and the cruise speed is 18 knots.'
  10. 'One is a powered catamaran that can travel at 30 knots, carrying 50 divers with their instructors and sufficient tanks for two dives.'

verb

Fasten with a knot.
  1. 'a knotted rope'
  2. 'He unhooks the bike frame and ties it tightly to his backpack, then doubles its rope round the wires and knots it tight.'
  3. 'Nearby a female worker tests for leaks by filling condoms with water, knotting the ends, and kneading them like bread dough on a brown paper towel.'
  4. 'Aidan knew right away the man was homeless: he wore a rumpled, torn black suit that looked like he snatched it from a dumpster, and a frayed tie loosely knotted around his neck.'
  5. 'He stood in front of the tall mirror in his room and knotted the tie on his dress blue uniform.'
  6. 'Al finished knotting the bandage and placed a second pillow beneath the young man's head.'
  7. 'He had been strangled with a piece of a T-shirt which had been knotted at the back of his neck.'
  8. 'His captor finished knotting the rope and pulled the gun back out of his pants.'
  9. 'Investigators also found some ties that had been knotted together and believe Yu had intended to use them as a rope before deciding to use electrical cord instead.'
  10. 'He nodded and knotted his scarf tighter and stuffed his hands in his pockets.'
  11. 'Two young men sit down close by, bright scarves knotted around their scrawny necks, eyeing me speculatively.'
  12. 'For example, the necklace is composed of nine different strands of woodchip coco beads, knotted by hand.'
Make (something, especially hair) tangled.
  1. 'Her normally sleek auburn hair was frizzy and knotted and her clothes were wrinkled from a night of restless sleep.'
  2. 'She took deep breaths, quickly running her fingers through her knotted hair.'
  3. 'He stood in front of me smiling broadly, skin oiled and supple, his hair tangled in a mass of knotted dreadlocks.'
  4. 'She shook her head roughly back and forth, knotting her hair even more, which slightly annoyed Melinda who would have to help her get the tangles out in the morning.'
  5. 'My hair was knotted in a tangled mess, giving me a wild look.'
  6. 'My hair was knotted and difficult to put a brush through.'
  7. 'Her long blond hair, knotted with traces of blood, trailed behind her.'
  8. 'A knotweed is so called because its roots are knotted or twisted.'
  9. 'Newborn asphyxia may also result when the umbilical cord is compressed between the baby's body and the uterine wall, or when the umbilical cord becomes knotted.'
  10. 'A dog, white and black hair tangled in a knotted mess, slept at the girl's feet, paws twitching every once in a while, signs that he was dreaming.'
Cause (a muscle) to become tense and hard.
  1. 'After about 10 minutes, I felt muscles knotted from a 12-week training schedule start to loosen up.'
  2. 'Here is the place to try a hot stone massage, where warm basalt stones from the desert's dry river beds are used in a deep massage to ease any knotted muscles.'
  3. 'Electricity is also used to stimulate tense and knotted muscles.'
  4. 'I quit talking as his hands began to knead my tired, knotted muscles and one by one, I felt them all begin to slacken.'
  5. 'Frank exhaled, feeling a lessening of the tension that had been knotting his stomach muscles all week.'
  6. 'She went to the bathroom to run a hot bath to help release what she thought was knotted muscles.'
  7. 'Hands traveled down my back, massaging my knotted muscles.'
  8. 'Her fingers dug expertly into the knotted muscles of my shoulders, pummelled my back, massaged the tension out of my neck.'
  9. 'Chills ran up and down his entire body, and he felt his stomach knotting fearfully.'
  10. 'Her lip quivered slightly and her stomach knotted again.'
  11. 'But now, Jess could feel her stomach turning, knotting up inside her and making her nauseous.'
  12. 'Her stomach knotted together, her heart jammed in her throat.'
  13. 'I could feel my stomach knotting up and I was shivering.'
  14. 'She walked through the giant doors in the huge gothic building and her stomach began to knot up.'
  15. 'Donna can feel her stomach knotting in anticipation.'
  16. 'She glanced at the signature first, her stomach knotting as the glance confirmed it was from Phillip.'
  17. 'My stomach knots itself in fear as I wait for the appearance of a man who controls my destiny, my Fate, and my life.'
  18. 'Now my stomach knotted as I wondered what I'd gotten myself into.'

noun

A small, relatively short-billed sandpiper, with a reddish-brown or blackish breast in the breeding season.
  1. 'Many immature avocets spend their first summer after fledging well south of breeding areas, as do immature grey plovers, bar-tailed godwits and knot.'
  2. 'The Humber Estuary supports more than 150,000 birds each year including knot, lapwing, golden plover and breeding little terns.'

More definitions

1. an interlacing, twining, looping, etc., of a cord, rope, or the like, drawn tight into a knob or lump, for fastening, binding, or connecting two cords together or a cord to something else.

2. a piece of ribbon or similar material tied or folded upon itself and used or worn as an ornament.

3. a group or cluster of persons or things: a knot of spectators.

4. the hard, cross-grained mass of wood at the place where a branch joins the trunk of a tree.

5. a part of this mass showing in

More examples(as adjective)

"winds can be knot."

"gustings can be knot."

"drops can be knot."

"air speeds can be knot."

Origin

(knot)Late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Phrase

at a rate of knots
get knotted
tie someone (up) in knots
tie the knot