Adjective "knifed" definition and examples

(Knifed may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/nʌɪf/

Definitions and examples

noun

An instrument composed of a blade fixed into a handle, used for cutting or as a weapon.
  1. 'However, other weapons, including knives and meat cleavers, were discovered at the scene.'
  2. 'Peel the grapefruit and, using a serrated knife, cut out individual sections so that no white pith remains.'
  3. 'My guts still feel like the surgeon's knife is still in them.'
  4. 'The homeowner and one suspect were treated for knife wounds at Lions Gate Hospital.'
  5. 'Solomon put his knife and fork neatly by the side of his plate and sipped a glass of Chablis.'
  6. 'Take your sharpest serrated bread knife and cut the stick in half across the middle.'
  7. 'As well as the heroin they found cannabis, cash and a number of weapons, including firearms, a sword and knives.'
  8. 'Almost every day evidence emerges in the courts of the lethal culture of knives and other sharp weapons that is infecting Britain.'
  9. 'Using a sharp knife, peel, core and slice the apples into thin wedges.'
  10. 'The murder weapon, a knife, was discovered on the passenger seat of his car earlier this afternoon.'
  11. 'The machine has a knife which cuts open the fabric lengthwise as fast as it knits and is self acting.'

verb

Stab (someone) with a knife.
  1. 'Dozens of civilians, including an old man who was defending his children, were shot down or, in the case of the old man, were knifed to death.'
  2. 'Daniels had been discharged on conduct unbecoming an officer when he knifed someone in a bar in Saigon in 1972.'
  3. 'The 52-year-old builder, originally from Beaufort, was viciously knifed to death while waiting for a train in London.'
  4. 'She was allegedly knifed by her ex-partner after which he tried to cut his throat and stabbed himself in the chest, police said.'
  5. 'Fourteen people have been knifed in a Chinese internet cafe after two men ran amok in a terrifying 20 minute attack.'
  6. 'A well-known heroin dealer was being quizzed in a Dublin Garda station some weeks ago about the death of a man who was knifed 30 times and buried in a shallow grave.'
  7. 'Paramedics at the scene said a woman - the flight attendant - was knifed to death and two men were killed by gunfire.'
  8. 'As well as knifing his fiancée, he punched and kicked her and stamped on her chest in a row over the wedding.'
  9. 'A telecommunications worker admitted knifing his partner, her son and the dog to death at the family home.'
  10. 'The victim, a 17-year-old boy, was taken to Mayday Hospital after he was knifed while sitting at a bus stop in Beulah Hill last Friday.'
  11. 'a shard of steel knifed through the mainsail'
  12. 'The water came right up to the walkway, and a few Ring-billed Gulls knifed into the wind, sailing over dozens of ducks and coots.'
  13. 'The project's opponents concede the project is tastefully designed, with no Nassau-type high-rises knifing into the sky.'

More definitions

1. an instrument for cutting, consisting essentially of a thin, sharp-edged, metal blade fitted with a handle.

2. a knifelike weapon; dagger or short sword.

3. any blade for cutting, as in a tool or machine. verb (used with object), knifed, knifing.

4. to apply a knife to; cut, stab, etc., with a knife.

5. to attempt to defeat or undermine in a secret or underhanded way. verb (used without object), knifed, knifing.

6. to move or cleave t

More examples(as adjective)

"wheezes can be knifed."

"settlers can be knifed."

Origin

(knife)Late Old English cnīf, from Old Norse knífr, of Germanic origin.

Phrase

before you can say knife
that one could cut with a knife
get (or stick) the knife into (or in) someone
go (or be) under the knife
the knives are out (for someone)
like a (hot) knife through butter
twist (or turn) the knife (in the wound)