Adjective "kilogram" definition and examples

(Kilogram may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈkɪləɡram/

Advertisement

Definitions and examples

noun

The SI unit of mass, equivalent to the international standard kept at Sèvres near Paris (approximately 2.205 lb).
  1. 'Weight was measured to the nearest kilogram using a portable bathroom scale.'
  2. 'The missiles are filled with volatile rocket fuel and two hundred kilograms of high explosives.'
  3. 'Did you know that the athletes taking part will eat 25,000 kilogrammes of cheese, more than 10,000 kilogrammes of pasta, and a hundred kilogrammes of garlic.'
  4. 'These systems would send tens or hundreds of kilograms instead of tons into orbit per launch.'
  5. 'Progress can be slow; you measure it in inches and feet, not miles or kilograms.'
  6. 'Take your weight in kilograms and divide it by your height in metres squared.'
  7. 'A newton has a mass unit of kilograms and an acceleration unit of meters squared per second.'
  8. 'Rose attar is the costliest since a hundred kilograms of roses yield only two grams of attar.'
  9. 'By trading in imperial measures (pounds and ounces), he was apparently contravening legislation that came into being on 1 January which made the kilogramme the standard unit measurement of weight for loose goods in Britain.'
  10. 'A person's BMI is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by height in meters squared.'

More definitions

1. a unit of mass equal to 1000 grams: the basic unit of mass in the International System of Units (SI), equal to the mass of the international prototype of the kilogram, a platinum-iridium cylinder kept in Sèvres, France.Abbreviation:kg.

2. a unit of force and weight, equal to the force that produces an acceleration of 9.80665 meters per second per second when acting on a mass of one kilogram.Abbreviation:kg.

More examples(as adjective)

"wills can be kilogram."

"sizes can be kilogram."

"limits can be kilogram."

Origin

Late 18th century: from French kilogramme (see kilo-, gram).