Adjective "juvenile" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈdʒuːvənʌɪl/

Definitions and examples

adjective

For or relating to young people.
  1. 'It is an indispensable resource for informed professionals who strive to shape the juvenile justice system today.'
  2. 'The classification as infantile or juvenile forms depends on the amount of renal disease present.'
  3. 'As juvenile crime rises, here and across the country, tonight's confessions of a York teenager make provocative reading.'
  4. 'Despite occasional warnings about a rising tide of juvenile crime, the statistics show a determined resistance to inflation.'
  5. 'Promoting juvenile talent is the lifeblood and future of any sporting club.'
  6. 'Cowboy stars underscored the identity and nature of the enemy for their juvenile viewers and urged all citizens to do their part to help win the war.'
  7. 'Since the latter half of the nineteenth century, the police have been the foremost public authorities who regulate juvenile crime and delinquency.'
  8. 'Talk to people who live on the Brunshaw estate and the same themes come up time and time again: crime, juvenile nuisance, drug dealing, vandalism and anti-social behaviour.'
  9. 'Typically, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis appears between the ages of 6 months and 16 years.'
  10. 'The main goal of the juvenile justice system is rehabilitation rather than punishment.'
  11. 'the romantic juvenile lead'
  12. 'Michael Conrad is rapidly becoming the light juvenile lead of Oval House.'
  13. 'The next day he received a letter from London saying his audition for the juvenile lead in a musical comedy had been successful.'
  14. 'He represented Sarsfields at juvenile and minor level, and was chosen as The Patrician College Sportsman of the Year for his achievements on the golf course.'
  15. 'Lydon was well known for playing the juvenile lead in a series in the early 1940s, and his work here tends to retain the flavour of that character.'
  16. 'She didn't suffer fools gladly, which seemed to include all the juvenile actors she had to work with in TV.'
  17. 'the prey of juvenile owls'
  18. 'The second assumption is that juvenile recruitment into bird populations must operate at the same scale as mast production.'
  19. 'They stay nearby for 7 to 10 days and then flock with other juvenile birds.'
  20. 'Certainly juvenile animals are a common prey of large carnivores today, and it is no surprise that similar patterns should have played out in the past.'
  21. 'At about four years of age young males form a juvenile group.'
  22. 'Juvenile plumage is seldom seen in Washington, although some birds in juvenile plumage can be seen in the eastern flyway.'
  23. 'A juvenile green turtle was found with a plastic bag wound tightly around its right flipper, cutting off blood flow, aquarium curator Willie Maritz said yesterday.'
  24. 'We conducted focal animal observations on juvenile three-spot damselfish in both continuous and patch reef habitat in 1991 and 1997.'
  25. 'Migratory movements have been recorded in both juvenile and adult birds.'
  26. 'After that they may join a flock of other juvenile birds.'
  27. 'In lower vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, the pronephros acts as the functional kidney in the immature juvenile stages, but the mesonephros is the functional kidney in the adult.'
Childish; immature.
  1. 'I feel this need to show people we can do it on our own but I recognize how silly and destructive and completely juvenile this attitude is.'
  2. 'This tour is excruciatingly banal and juvenile, lightened only by the silly antics of his friend Joe.'
  3. 'The Earl of Tyrconnell was no better than King William's officers, King James was as juvenile and foolish as King William, and Irish national identity as a whole became the object of scorn.'
  4. 'Ally felt herself smiling, even though their entire conversation had been so utterly juvenile.'
  5. 'He crumpled up the juvenile green and yellow paper wrappings and tossed them into a plastic sack.'
  6. 'I know it sounds juvenile and stupid but I really wanted to see the look on Skinner's face.'
  7. 'Asked about the motivation for the vandalism, he said it was simply a case of very juvenile, immature peer pressure.'
  8. 'The movie isn't without its flaws, however, as some of the humour is rather juvenile, and some just plain stupid.'
  9. 'Secondly, he is sitting upon a pitchfork and refuses to move himself, or thirdly he is a silly, juvenile incompetent and has no place in this Chamber.'
  10. 'Let me clarify: they aren't acting immature or juvenile; they're acting like young, inexperienced adults.'

noun

A young person.
  1. 'Police in Blackburn confirmed that there had been some minor disorder involving juveniles at the event and one person had been arrested for carrying an offensive weapon.'
  2. 'Unsupervised juveniles engaging in anti-social activity has been an ongoing problem for the shires of Irwin and Mullewa.'
  3. 'Latino and black young people have been hit hardest by the crackdown on juveniles.'
  4. '18-to - 24-year-olds don't seem to be kids, and they don't seem to be juveniles.'
  5. 'Indeed, the same could apply to rugby where there is little precaution to shield juniors and juveniles from being exposed to the habits of their superiors.'
  6. 'It promises efforts to correct behavioural problems among juveniles and to adopt changes to educational programmes, with new curricula, texts and teaching methods to reduce stress on kids.'
  7. 'The valuable contribution animals can make in a classroom and to the healthy development of children and juveniles has already been established.'
  8. 'But drug companies carry out few trials involving children because drugs for juveniles are not very profitable and there are ethical difficulties in using youngsters as ‘guinea pigs’.'
  9. 'The club caters for juniors and juveniles on Fridays from 7.30 to 11 pm and for adults only on Wednesday nights from 7.30 to 11 pm.'
  10. 'It was the first time that the juveniles (boys and girls) took part in this competition.'
  11. 'While the age of juveniles in the criminal justice system will be raised from 17 to 18, the only other change will see significant new powers put into the hands of the police.'
  12. 'However, after yesterday's verdict, Justice Malcolm Holdip said he had to defer sentencing to today because he was unable to find the proper sentencing for convicted juveniles.'
  13. 'But legal considerations plausibly have a great deal to do with increases in incarceration, capital punishment, and criminal prosecution of juveniles.'
  14. 'Bill specialized in likeable but none-too-bright juveniles and young leads.'
  15. 'the light-coloured plumage of a juvenile'
  16. 'Other studies of riparian breeding birds in which juveniles molt on the breeding grounds have not examined that possibility.'
  17. 'Investigators have also observed newly independent juveniles preying on young of the same or related species.'
  18. 'We found evidence indicating that increased movement rates may increase the risk of predation for adult birds but not juveniles.'

Definitions

1. of, pertaining to, characteristic of, or suitable or intended for young persons: juvenile books.

2. young; youthful: juvenile years.

3. immature; childish; infantile: His juvenile tantrums are not in keeping with his age. noun

4. a young person; youth.

5. Theater. a youthful male or female role. an actor or actress who plays such parts.

6. a book for children.

7. Ornithology. a young bird in the stage when it has fledged, if altricial, or has replaced down of hatchin

More examples(as adjective)

"crimes can be juvenile."

"delinquencies can be juvenile."

"offenders can be juvenile."

"courts can be juvenile."

"centres can be juvenile."

More examples++

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin juvenilis, from juvenis ‘young, a young person’.