Adjective "jemmy" definition and examples

(Jemmy may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈdʒɛmi/

Definitions and examples

noun

A short crowbar used by a burglar to force open a window or door.
  1. 'We'll swing by your place and pick up some jimmies and things for you!'
  2. 'The stereo was gone, the front door was bent open with a jimmy, and all my cds had been taken.'
  3. 'The typical villain doesn't go out after 10 pm in a stripey jersey, carrying a jemmy and a bag with Swag written on it.'
  4. 'It is undisputed that the small ‘transom’ window was forced open with a screwdriver or jemmy.'
  5. 'I do own and use a car, but if I have a jemmy, I certainly don't carry it around.'

verb

Force open (a window or door) with a jemmy.
  1. 'Security bolts had been jemmied out of the wall and chains had been pulled through the wheels of bikes, breaking the spokes.'
  2. 'Miss Kelly said their attempt to jemmy the shop door set off the burglar alarm alerting passing motorist Andrew Carlton.'
  3. 'Arven tried to warn her, but she jimmied it open.'
  4. 'A front door was jemmied open and thieves stole jewellery, a mobile phone, DVDs and a PlayStation 2 console worth a total of £2,000.'
  5. 'Then, out of sight, they jemmied the outside door and smashed through another internal door, which was locked.'
  6. 'He extended a hooked claw and jimmied the window open.'
  7. 'Police believe they jemmied open his front door, which was usually double-locked.'
  8. 'Lee guesses the dark shapes are jimmying the lock.'
  9. 'When she couldn't find the key in its normal hiding spot, she jimmied the lock and let herself in.'
  10. 'Anyway, by climbing up the cherry tree, swinging across to the balcony and jemmying the window, we soon found that getting in through the bathroom was a doddle.'

More definitions

1. jimmy1 . noun, plural jemmies.

2. jimmy1 .

3. Slang. an overcoat.

4. the baked head of a sheep.

More examples(as adjective)

"bars can be jemmy."

Origin

Early 19th century: pet form of the given name James (compare with jack).