Adjective "ilk" definition and examples

(Ilk may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ɪlk/

Definitions and examples

noun

A type of person or thing similar to one already referred to.
  1. 'there was music by Parry and Elgar and others of that ilk'
  2. 'I suspect my old school chums, those who were of the right ilk, went down this path and have continued.'
  3. 'The drive to increase access to universities fits in with New Labour pronouncements on social inclusion and the ilk.'
  4. 'I grieve for both that they have had to, and still must, live amongst the ilk known as the British.'
  5. 'He proves he is in the same ilk as other great soul singers like Barry White and Marvin Gaye.'
  6. 'The sorts of excuses we are seeing from George and his ilk are truly disgusting.'
  7. 'You would hardly say that the Greens are monarchists or from the conservative ilk.'
  8. 'But so it was until it was won by vibrant and brave men of the ilk of Sir George.'
  9. 'All my friends and acquaintances throughout my life have been of the same ilk.'
  10. 'As a former footballer myself, I know that they are of the simplest ilk.'
  11. 'Yet rather than opting for safe tracks of the same ilk, Doves have chosen to expand their sound.'
  12. 'Wallace, whose father liked to pretend that he could trace his family tree back to William of that ilk and claim kinship, proposed the theory of evolution by natural selection independently of Darwin.'
  13. 'A wry smile at that one, you suspect, from Sir Alex of that ilk, currently brooding on the other side of the same city.'
  14. 'Father Peter Lamont of that ilk, head of the Lamont clan, is a Catholic priest who teaches children in New South Wales.'

More definitions

1. family, class, or kind: he and all his ilk. adjective

2. same. Idioms

3. of that ilk, (in Scotland) of the same family name or place: Ross of that ilk, i.e., Ross of Ross. of the same class or kind.

More examples(as adjective)

"stills can be ilk."

Origin

(ilk)Old English ilca ‘same’, of Germanic origin; related to alike.