Adjective "ice" definition and examples

(Ice may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ʌɪs/

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Definitions and examples

noun

Frozen water, a brittle transparent crystalline solid.
  1. 'her hands were as cold as ice'
  2. 'Her foot broke through a patch of brittle ice to black frozen mud below.'
  3. 'A blue beam shot out of my armor and froze Floria in a solid block of ice.'
  4. 'In a matter of seconds, the toxarin was frozen into a solid block of ice.'
  5. 'It was crystallized and covered in a cover of solid ice.'
  6. 'To keep food cool in summer we had an ice chest for which blocks of ice were transported from town.'
  7. 'It froze into solid, treacherous ice when the temperature dropped again at night.'
  8. 'That way the mixture will freeze quicker, preventing ice from crystallizing and giving you a smoother product.'
  9. 'It is a solid river of ice broken into huge blocks, thrust downwards by a glacier or very large Yeti.'
  10. 'Chenu reached over and touched it, and sure enough, it was a solid block of ice.'
  11. 'Eventually they learnt to leave a full bucket of water outdoors until it had frozen solid and then hollow out the block of ice.'
  12. 'In the winter, a thick sheet of ice covered the water and was a spectacular sight to see.'
  13. 'Only at the planet's poles do the temperature and pressure let water exist, as ice, on the surface.'
  14. 'There was a thin layer of ice on the surface, and she realised that her knees were getting wet through the fabric of her dress.'
  15. 'The ice rippled over the surface of the water, a thin layer that clung to the sides of Morgana's face and circled her wrist.'
  16. 'An Icelandic horse, capable of maintaining significant speed over lava fields and sheet ice, couldn't stay upright on asphalt.'
  17. 'With a layer of ice on top, the water beneath is less prone to freeze.'
  18. 'Skaters were also having a splendid time in Victoria Park, which had been flooded, and was covered with a sheet of ice in grand condition.'
  19. 'A little lake stretched across part of it, covered in sheets of ice.'
  20. 'Sheets of ice crusted the water, especially closer to the shore.'
  21. 'First of all the Arctic ice sheet is floating, it's a thin layer of ice.'
  22. 'the ice in his voice was only to hide the pain'
  23. 'He was pulled from a world of ice and hate into a world of warmth and confusion.'
  24. 'Her voice was like ice, and he could feel nothing but cold darkness within her.'
  25. 'He didn't want to know what made this ice hard woman shriek in such a manner.'
  26. 'The second movement, the composer told me, should be played not expressively, but like ice.'
  27. '‘Get in the car,’ he said in a steel voice lined with ice, but at the same time as smooth as chocolate.'
  28. 'The visitor's lips were twisted blue with cold, the voice was of splintered ice.'
  29. 'His voice had ice in it, but he didn't even look back, he just kept on going.'
  30. 'His mood is vastly improved from before, but I can still detect an edge of ice underneath his voice.'
  31. 'His voice was like ice, sending a chill through my body.'
  32. 'Aluryne's voice suddenly held ice, it shocked Fleiya and Lyken.'
An ice cream, ice lolly, or portion of water ice.
  1. 'Oh, and there's treacle tart or very creamy home-made ices for pudding.'
  2. 'Try serving ices and sorbets in flower-studded ‘ice-bowls’.'
  3. 'On the ice cream front I managed to get by with only two tubs of vanilla ice, two of orange sorbet, one portion of rose, two of pear, and 500 ml of mango.'
  4. 'You are really looking at water ices appearing in the 1660s, and cream ices appearing in the 18th century.'
  5. 'An ice cream van which sold ices to fellow challengers during the 25-day trip also made it to the African destination.'
  6. 'A tray of miniature fruit ices appeared after dessert, along with mint truffles and slivers of candied ginger.'
  7. 'Low-fat means sorbet, ices, frozen yogurt, sherbet, or low-fat ice cream.'
  8. 'If you like the fragrance of mango and want your ice with more fruit than syrup, then this dish is a must on your first visit.'
Diamonds.

    verb

    Decorate (a cake or biscuit) with icing.
    1. 'I slammed the kitchen door on the pair of them and set about icing my cake.'
    2. 'Turn the layers out onto cake racks to cool thoroughly before icing the cake.'
    3. 'Laying the road surfaces has been compared to icing a cake.'
    4. 'And with a couple of minutes left, Moffett iced the Damolly cake.'
    5. 'Brown polished it off, helping English to a battling 75 before icing the cake with a fierce drive through mid-wicket towards the nearest hedge.'
    6. 'I was fully prepared to ice cupcakes for the rest of my life, and never speak about this again.'
    7. 'Using a fine nozzle, the design is extruded onto the surface in a manner a bit like icing a cake.'
    8. 'England, however, made the fatal error of believing this advance publicity - and in their haste, they tried to ice their cake before it had had time to cool.'
    9. 'When cool, ice with chocolate icing and cut into squares.'
    10. 'Be sure and save a fair amount of frosting in the bowls for icing the cookies themselves.'
    Clinch (something such as a victory or deal).
    1. 'Detroit has iced a contender in each of the past dozen years.'
    Kill.

      noun

      An entry stored in a person's mobile phone that provides emergency contact information.
      1. 'We have been inundated with emails and phone calls from people worried that, having put ICE into their mobiles, they are now going to be charged for the privilege.'
      2. 'If you've been in an accident, one of the first places paramedics will check for a next-of-kin ICE contact is your mobile phone.'
      3. 'The idea is that you enter the word ICE in your cellphone address book and against it the number of the person who you would want to be contacted 'in case of emergency'.'
      4. 'We received an email claiming that having an ICE entry in your phone book could expose your mobile to a downloadable virus.'
      5. 'A helper, or emergency worker, would simply be able to use your phone and dial your pre-entered ICE numbers telling friends of relations what had happened.'

      More definitions

      1. the solid form of water, produced by freezing; frozen water.

      2. the frozen surface of a body of water.

      3. any substance resembling frozen water: camphor ice.

      4. a frozen dessert made of sweetened water and fruit juice.

      5. British. ice cream.

      6. icing, as on a cake.

      7. reserve; formality: The ice of his manner betrayed his dislike of the new ambassador.

      8. Slang. a diamond or diamonds. protection money paid to the police by the operator of an illicit business. a fee that a

      More examples(as adjective)

      "weeks can be ice."

      "manufacturers can be ice."

      "maidens can be ice."

      "gears can be ice."

      "flavours can be ice."

      More examples++

      Origin

      Early 21st century: acronym from in case of emergency.

      Phrase

      ice over/up