Adjective "iambic" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ʌɪˈambɪk/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Of or using iambuses.
  1. 'This probably refers to the anapaestic and iambic chants which accompanied armed dances and processions at certain Spartan festivals.'
  2. 'That particular line-length is easy to swallow, while its iambic rocking gives a steady rhythmical pleasure to listeners.'
  3. 'He kept the iambic blank verse form but relieved it entirely of its poetic burden.'
  4. 'Here is how Arthur Golding rendered the scene, in iambic heptameter couplets, about the time Shakespeare was born.'
  5. 'In this year he sits down to compose 23 farewell letters to his friends, each set into conversational iambic hexameter.'
  6. 'Even students with a strong background in form tend to be familiar only with iambic meter.'
  7. 'The central theme of iambic poetry was traditionally invective, that is personal attack, mockery, and satire.'
  8. 'The second section of the poem, the last four lines, alternate between iambic tetrameter and pentameter.'

noun

Iambic verse as a genre.
  1. 'These days my feet tend more to the caution of the spondaic than the remorseless, heroic march of the iambic.'
  2. 'A drunk, a brawler, a pathetic lover, Hipponax invented the ‘limping iambic, also known as the scazon.’'
  3. 'While still at school he translated Euripides Medea from Greek into Latin iambics.'
  4. 'There is often a meandering discursivity in the rhythm and content of Prynne's fractured iambics.'
  5. 'She will slip from dactyls to iambics, pentameter to trimeter, quatrains to sestets.'

Definitions

1. Prosody. pertaining to the iamb. consisting of or employing an iamb or iambs.

2. Greek Literature. noting or pertaining to satirical poetry written in iambs. noun

3. Prosody. an iamb. Usually, iambics. a verse or poem consisting of iambs.

4. Greek Literature. a satirical poem in this meter.

More examples(as adjective)

"pentameterses can be iambic."

"youths can be iambic."

"poets can be iambic."

"pentameters can be iambic."

"metres can be iambic."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French iambique, via late Latin from Greek iambikos, from iambos (see iambus).