Adjective "hurt" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/həːt/

Definitions and examples

verb

Cause pain or injury to.
  1. no object 'does acupuncture hurt?'
  2. 'The man, who was not wearing a cycle helmet, was seriously hurt, but his injuries are not thought to be life-threatening.'
  3. 'Strange as it seems, self-injurers feel little or no pain when they hurt themselves.'
  4. 'The paramedic who rushed to the scene of the injury was himself hurt when a cupboard fell on his back while he was putting a fluid line into the hand of one of the injured shoppers.'
  5. 'On top of that, they're going to get a lot of guys back defensively who have been hurt by nagging injuries.'
  6. 'The pain hurt Spinner, but his mind was in a daze so bad that he was almost numbed.'
  7. 'You know the birth is going to hurt - more pain than you can ever imagine.'
  8. 'Despite being seriously hurt, their injuries are not life-threatening, and their families are with them at the hospital.'
  9. 'They would hurt you till you cry out then hurt you even worse so you are begging for the previous pain because it hurt less.'
  10. 'Xander got up slowly, a terrible blazing pain hurting his left arm.'
  11. 'His injuries hurt him, but one of them had to be able to walk out of there.'
  12. 'Being ill sucks, I have a summer fluey/cold thing which is making my bones ache, and my head hurt and I am tired and falling asleep at the drop of a hat.'
  13. 'My body hurts so much that I can barely hold myself upright.'
  14. 'My left shoulder had been hurting for a year since a bike accident.'
  15. 'He was tired and his body was hurting all over, but he persevered.'
  16. 'Players need to stretch out the parts of the body that hurt, relax and let the pulse rate drop.'
  17. 'My body hurts, but the coldness is so predominant that I don't care.'
  18. 'My chest hurts and my body feels canted at the wrong angle.'
  19. 'The problem when you are injured is regaining strength - but your body hurts all the time and exercise causes even more pain.'
  20. 'Her ribs ached, her stomach hurt unmercifully, and her back was killing her.'
  21. 'And his eyes were hurting, throbbing, burning when he looked at her.'
  22. 'she didn't want to hurt his feelings'
  23. 'It was always painful to hurt other people's feelings, and to destroy their hopes along with it.'
  24. 'It hurts me sore to say it, but, however she got there, we heard or saw nothing.'
  25. 'People are hurting and they are told relentlessly day in and day out that liberals from big cities are the ones inflicting the pain.'
  26. 'He replied sternly, but his voice indicated how badly he was hurting.'
  27. 'We were hurting badly and I wanted to know how Paul was feeling because he had missed the decisive penalty.'
  28. 'We cannot continue to turn a blind eye or ear and pretend that all is well when many people are hurting and yearning for help.'
  29. 'She was hurting, badly, and if she stayed the whole time, well that was just going to be a shock.'
  30. 'She would never let it show to anyone how she really felt, no-one knew just how badly she was hurting inside, not even her closest friends knew the half of it.'
  31. 'This state of affairs is very, very sad with many people hurting and, indeed, becoming disillusioned.'
  32. 'At least in there she knew she could never hurt as badly as she had last night.'
  33. 'If one person was hurting, he or she could pretty much count on having a good 4 or 5 people sticking close and offering an ear or a shoulder.'
  34. 'Understanding how much another person hurts emotionally is good and bad.'
Be detrimental to.
  1. 'The water shortage hurts the local economy as well as growers.'
  2. 'Raising tax rates would hurt the expansion and weaken the incentives that drive long-term growth.'
  3. 'Nonethless, it is still far too high, and the exchange rate is hurting NZ exporters.'
  4. 'That will raise long-term rates, hurt Toronto's equity markets, and delay the recovery.'
  5. 'And a sharp spike in interest rates would hurt some homeowners who have just got their foot on the housing ladder.'
  6. 'With employment, for example, there is a level of distress that hurts demand.'
  7. 'Higher interest rates can hurt stocks because they raise the cost of borrowing to expand businesses and cut into corporate profits.'
  8. 'Of course, there's always a risk the markets will overdo it and push long-term interest rates too high, hurting the economy in the process.'
  9. 'This may help the ecosystem, but it hurts the economy.'
  10. 'Raising rates now would hurt economic growth in the US and stifle the green shoots of recovery in Europe.'
Have a pressing need for.
  1. 'Now, the question is, of course, if those fail, can she continue to make that kind of money, not that she's hurting for money these days, I'm sure?'
  2. '‘It is difficult to understand exactly why people do this, but it could be an abnormal way of illicitly seeking love or care - they may actually be hurting for love,’ he said.'
  3. 'I take it that the bus routes were created when Metro trains were still relatively new and hurting for customers, and the idea was to feed them with the buses.'
  4. 'Despite her whopping $50 million settlement she is said to be hurting for cash.'
  5. 'Not terribly big, but big enough that we weren't hurting for money.'

adjective

Physically injured.
  1. 'dogs and cats with hurt paws'
  2. 'Unfortunately, he's got a hurt shoulder, so Hayley dances with Leonardo.'
  3. 'A player comes hobbling off out of the game with a hurt knee.'
  4. 'She demanded he take her to a doctor to have her hurt finger attended to.'
  5. 'I was worried about him looking hurt yesterday, but he comes to work and plays through pain.'
  6. 'I felt so hurt and alone'
  7. 'He tells Hannah he has to get to sleep since he's got work tomorrow and she seems hurt and shocked.'
  8. '"There were hurt feelings on both sides, you know," he said in a phone interview.'
  9. 'He could not look at Zoya's hurt face and he walked off.'
  10. 'At its best, the theater is a balm for hurt minds.'
  11. 'Out of the corner of his eye he glimpsed the hurt look on her face.'

noun

Physical injury; harm.
  1. 'As one correspondent puts it, the message that hurt does not mean harm needs reinforcing.'
  2. 'It is to Nicola's eternal credit that her main concern was that those with her in the salon had managed to dash to safety and escape physical hurt.'
  3. 'On Monday, a mystery blast on the capital's main street inflicted direct physical hurt on more than a dozen people.'
  4. 'The hurt or injury need not be serious or permanent but must be more than trifling or transient.'
  5. 'While there was undoubtedly physical hurt, it is the psychological damage that rankles most.'
  6. 'He tried reaching over to his right pocket but any shift in his position now meant a world of hurt from his open wounds.'
  7. 'her eyes reflected her unhappiness and hurt'
  8. 'Elsie didn't feel sad at those words, nor did she feel a pang of hurt.'
  9. 'Joey felt a pang of hurt at the mention of Lauren's name, but she contained herself.'
  10. 'He felt a pang of hurt and shock, to think that his sis, the one person he could always trust, wouldn't tell him when the wake was.'
  11. 'I got in the shower, the hot water seemed to away a tiny bit of my stress and hurt, though not much.'
  12. 'There are so many people around the world who are reliving their hurt.'
  13. 'Besides, the last comment he bestowed upon her still caused small pangs of hurt, though he probably did not care.'
  14. 'I look like a cool and chilled person, but I gathered all my past hurt while acting.'
  15. 'He was remembering hurts, and feeling new pains.'
  16. 'The judge told him that personal hurt is no reason to break the law.'
  17. 'It's extremely difficult to do, and I think that one of the reasons that people tend to hold on to their hurts or to their upsets is that it does require giving up part of yourself.'

Definitions

1. to cause bodily injury to; injure: He was badly hurt in the accident.

2. to cause bodily pain to or in: The wound still hurts him.

3. to damage or decrease the efficiency of (a material object) by striking, rough use, improper care, etc.: Moths can't hurt this suit because it's mothproof. Dirty oil can hurt a car's engine.

4. to affect adversely; harm: to hurt one's reputation; It wouldn't hurt the lawn if you watered it more often.

More examples(as adjective)

"duchesses can be hurt by stories."

"stocks can be hurt by sales."

"scores can be hurt at demonstrations."

"places can be hurt in clashes."

"people can be hurt to responses."

More examples++

Origin

Middle English (originally in the senses ‘to strike’ and ‘a blow’): from Old French hurter (verb), hurt (noun), perhaps ultimately of Germanic origin.