Adjective "guilty" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈɡɪlti/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Culpable of or responsible for a specified wrongdoing.
  1. 'Williams pleaded guilty to three separate offences'
  2. 'It is suggested that such a defendant should be regarded as being guilty of manslaughter and not murder.'
  3. 'You say this article carries the imputation that your client is guilty of procuring arson.'
  4. 'He had pleaded guilty on the first day of his trial to the lesser offence of theft, but that plea was not accepted by the Crown.'
  5. 'He denied murder but pleaded guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility.'
  6. 'Some defendants were found guilty on this count and sentenced either to death or to long terms of imprisonment.'
  7. 'She subsequently pleaded guilty to and he was found guilty of possession of cannabis resin with intent to supply.'
  8. 'He pleaded guilty to three other indecent assaults on the same youngster.'
  9. 'He pleaded guilty to the second count of assault on the second day in the presence of the jury panel.'
  10. 'Another convicted man who appeared for sentencing had pleaded guilty to wounding.'
  11. 'You will remember he told you he pleaded guilty to that offence; he admitted that offence.'
  12. 'The French side looked agitated on the pitch and were guilty of a number of handling errors.'
  13. 'Nor should we be guilty of the error of assuming that the problem relates only to Genesis.'
  14. 'If this is what critics meant - and still mean - by reckless, then I am guilty of that charge.'
  15. 'He made a strategic error and was at best guilty of political naivety, at worst of incompetence.'
  16. 'he felt guilty about the way he had treated her'
  17. 'The reviewer is haunted by a guilty conscience: many of us did not write down what we could have.'
  18. 'It's what we tell ourselves to salve our guilty consciences as we walk on by.'
  19. 'History is littered with the guilty consciences of those who chose to remain silent.'
  20. 'We rarely realise here in Great Britain how lucky we to lack a guilty national conscience.'
  21. 'I paused, and thought of something to make her feel less guilty.'
  22. 'Seemingly, I would alleviate my guilty conscience by showering him with presents.'
  23. 'For a man of honour, a guilty conscience must be a dreadful, perhaps unbearable burden.'
  24. 'He never felt so guilty in his life but for what reason… He didn't know.'
  25. 'I actually felt guilty and regretted making that phone call more than anything.'
  26. 'Soon all that was left was nothing more than a ghostly echo of a guilty conscience.'
  27. 'a guilty secret'
  28. 'I have often noted transits to Uranus in this house denote a time when guilty secrets and hidden vices are exposed.'
  29. 'Homosexuality was his other guilty secret, which he kept hidden from public sight until he was in his seventies.'
  30. 'Until relatively recently, those of us who bet regularly had something of a guilty secret.'
  31. 'Goofing off is certainly one guilty pleasure I have perfected over the years.'
  32. 'Where once it was society's guilty secret, now there is a concerted effort to trawl for and publicise any hint of racism.'
  33. 'Another is that it's the phantom of a woman buried in the churchyard, who died with a guilty secret.'
  34. 'It is only when we learn of his guilty secret and hidden background that the casting provokes deep reservations.'
  35. 'The Sword and the Sorcerer is a very, very guilty pleasure for this judge.'

Definitions

1. having committed an offense, crime, violation, or wrong, especially against moral or penal law; justly subject to a certain accusation or penalty; culpable: The jury found her guilty of murder.

2. characterized by, connected with, or involving guilt: guilty intent.

3. having or showing a sense of guilt, whether real or imagined: a guilty conscience.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be guilty of things."

"people can be guilty to charges."

"people can be guilty to things."

"people can be guilty of offences."

"people can be guilty of murders."

More examples++

Origin

Old English gyltig (see guilt, -y).

Phrase

not guilty