Adjective "generous" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈdʒɛn(ə)rəs/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Showing a readiness to give more of something, especially money, than is strictly necessary or expected.
  1. 'He said residents living in and around Amesbury had always been very generous with their donations.'
  2. 'But he's generous with his time, his anecdotes, and especially his funny voices.'
  3. 'They are so generous with their time and talent and they are always more than willing to help out with causes such as this.'
  4. 'Tom thanked all those that supported the event and those who were so generous with their sponsorship.'
  5. 'He was generous with his time, but there was no free ice cream.'
  6. 'He was very generous with his time and always had a willingness to help others.'
  7. '"I've knew him to be generous to a fault.'
  8. 'He is generous with his time and money, and a principled and loyal friend.'
  9. 'It is generous with rumours and not always scrupulous about sources.'
  10. 'Nothing wrong ever came of being generous with your money, and he had enough to share.'
  11. 'a generous assessment of his work'
  12. '"Few people realise how generous she was to the students, " he said.'
  13. 'He wanted to pay his debts but here was a person too generous to let him.'
  14. 'I suppose I'm being a bit generous with that description too, aren't I?'
  15. 'But perhaps the audience was not feeling so generous.'
  16. 'To her family she was a loving, kind-hearted and generous mother and grandmother.'
  17. 'It was a generous and humane impulse that has brought huge benefits to this country.'
  18. 'Kind, generous and good natured, she was a good friend to many and was devoted to her family.'
  19. 'Generous by nature, she was a neighbour and friend of the highest order.'
  20. 'He was a great neighbour and generous friend and his kind nature and good humour endeared him to many.'
  21. 'Irish people and in particular Westport people have been so very generous in their support for us.'
(of a thing) larger or more plentiful than is usual or necessary.
  1. 'The portions were generous and I found my tuna to be a delight to savour.'
  2. 'My tuna was generous in size: a huge slab of fawny-brown meat with a mass of ground peppercorns on top.'
  3. 'Sprinkle, as you go, with generous pinches of flaky sea salt and vigorous twists of freshly ground black pepper.'
  4. 'Both are bright and generous in size, although neither has built-in storage facilities.'
  5. 'Add in the parsley, salt and a generous amount of freshly ground black pepper and toss.'
  6. 'The ads are clearly labeled, obvious and generous in size.'
  7. 'There are fabulous monthly draws with superb prizes and the draw also yields the local club generous financial support.'
  8. 'Put the minced lamb in a bowl, add the peeled and crushed garlic and a generous grinding of salt and black pepper.'
  9. 'One of Melbourne's miracles is the extraordinarily generous amount of space for players to relax in.'
  10. 'But it was a generous helping and a good beginning to the meal.'

Definitions

1. liberal in giving or sharing; unselfish: a generous patron of the arts; a generous gift.

2. free from meanness or smallness of mind or character; magnanimous.

3. large; abundant; ample: a generous portion of pie.

4. rich or strong in flavor: a generous wine.

5. fertile; prolific: generous soil.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be generous to people."

"people can be generous with things."

"people can be generous in ways."

"leaders can be generous in handings."

"places can be generous to critics."

More examples++

Origin

Late 16th century: via Old French from Latin generosus ‘noble, magnanimous’, from genus, gener- ‘stock, race’. The original sense was ‘of noble birth’, hence ‘characteristic of noble birth, courageous, magnanimous, not mean’.