Adjective "gaudy" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈɡɔːdi/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Extravagantly bright or showy, typically so as to be tasteless.
  1. 'And that's what it's all about, remember: putting the brakes on gaudy consumerism.'
  2. 'Who knew dated music, predictable gags, audience participation, gaudy costumes and blinding colours could be this much fun?'
  3. 'Some clowns prefer to wear bright and gaudy makeup, while others have a fondness for ludicrous masks.'
  4. 'There were a few people, however, who had on very gaudy, expensive clothing of bright colors.'
  5. 'Her dress was often very gaudy, with bright colors, and a sense of fashion that followed too closely behind fads.'
  6. 'Up to eighteen inches long, these gaudy fish have large plumes and fleshy flaps on their head that mimic colourful reef growth.'
  7. 'Perhaps through such long experience, the hotel somehow manages to both reek of exclusivity and wealth while dodging gaudy ostentation.'
  8. 'A wife is showing the husband this bathing suit, and he makes a comment about it being gaudy and not liking it.'
  9. 'It wouldn't surprise me to find that he's wearing mismatched, gaudy socks.'
  10. 'It was a strip of gaudy landscaping in front of a strip mall in glaring bright daylight.'

noun

A celebratory dinner or entertainment held by a college for old members.

    Definitions

    1. brilliantly or excessively showy: gaudy plumage.

    2. cheaply showy in a tasteless way; flashy.

    3. ostentatiously ornamented; garish.

    More examples(as adjective)

    "cockades can be gaudy on hats."

    "people can be gaudy."

    "colours can be gaudy."

    "clothes can be gaudy."

    "plumages can be gaudy."

    More examples++

    Origin

    (gaudy)Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘rejoicing, a celebration’): from Latin gaudium ‘joy’, or from gaude ‘rejoice!’, imperative of gaudere.