Adjective "gamine" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ɡaˈmiːn/

Definitions and examples

noun

A girl with a mischievous, boyish charm.
  1. 'In Self-Portrait, the artist presents herself as a clear-eyed gamine, seemingly defined by the field of animals, dolls and tchotchkes that surround her image.'
  2. 'He sleeps with the beautiful, full-figured prostitutes who walk the streets of Rue Bleue, pines after the gamine next door and develops a taste for rock 'n' roll and le jazz Americain.'
  3. 'When I think of flappers, I picture androgynous gamines in shapeless dresses and waggling beads sipping illegal hooch while the Charleston plays in the background.'
  4. 'Amélie is the perfect holiday movie for so many reasons, including the obvious fact that it involves a cute gamine who eventually gets everything her little heart desires.'
  5. 'The bel canto opera repertoire is most closely associated with Bellini's deranged heroines and Donizetti's game gamines.'
  6. 'These streets are the marketplace for garrulous gamine, who ekes out a living selling flowers to wealthy slummers.'
  7. 'She plays Julie, a stock character familiar to devotees of the art film: the adorably fey, nearly silent gamine looking for love.'
  8. 'Her performance in Love was remarkably assured; she seems the essential gamine.'
A female street urchin.
  1. 'What he's sent is Diane, a street gamine two jumps ahead of the gendarmes.'

adjective

(of a girl) attractively boyish.
  1. 'She sat there with her hair pulled back, her gamine face shining, her eyes slyly crinkling, and bit on her pencil.'
  2. 'Three decades later and Smith, with her wild grey mane and piercing eyes, has morphed from gamine mystic to mature sorcerer: a sybilline speaker of arcane truths.'
  3. 'While still at the school, she was spotted in London's Oxford Street by a modelling agency scout, who decided her tall, slender frame and gamine features made her a natural choice to stalk the catwalk.'
  4. 'On impulse, she arranges a meeting with the woman, who turns out to be a gamine art gallery director.'
  5. 'A gamine ingenue to her sophisticated divorcee, she plays this streetwise waif with the same knowing naivety that made the 12-year-old such a disturbingly seductive assassin's helpmate in her first film, Leon.'
  6. '‘But while I'm still alive I'm planting my seeds everywhere I go,’ vows the tiny, bespectacled American, whose joyful smile plays across her gamine features.'
  7. 'Others preferred the gamine look with a short boyish haircut.'
  8. 'Irena, with wide eyes and gamine hair, arrives in New Orleans to meet her brother for the first time.'
  9. 'The sophisticated, almost stentorian tone of her voice skyrockets by at least two octaves and the gamine pixie we all fell in love with is snapping my picture.'
  10. 'When images were being selected for the calendar, a picture featuring a gamine young model smoking a cigarette in an empty cafe was chosen.'
  11. 'With supple and beautifully proportioned body, short gamine haircut that emphasizes her lovely features and luscious long legs that swoop effortlessly skyward, she magnetizes with every movement.'
  12. 'It's hard to equate the gamine, charming, and very pretty but quite girl-next-door woman sitting before us with the singer, actress and face of L' Oreal who cannot leave home without trouble arising.'
  13. 'Watching the gamine Nicole, hair newly dark, eyes particularly blue, voice as Russian as vodka, you would be entitled to think all your birthdays have come at once.'
  14. 'The 75th anniversary of her birth falls on May 4, an occasion that will be celebrated with a season of her films at London's National Film Theatre, and which will doubtless inspire a spate of homages to her gamine elegance.'

Definitions

1. a neglected girl who is left to run about the streets.

2. a diminutive or very slender girl, especially one who is pert, impudent, or playfully mischievous. adjective

3. of or like a gamine: a gamine personality; clothes for the gamine figure.

More examples(as adjective)

"beauties can be gamine."

Origin

Late 19th century: French, feminine of gamin (see gamin).