Adjective "fungible" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈfʌn(d)ʒɪb(ə)l/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of goods contracted for without an individual specimen being specified) replaceable by another identical item; mutually interchangeable.
  1. 'In the media, television stations thousands of miles apart would hire fungible newscasters who looked and acted the same.'
  2. 'The solution was to provide legislatively for rights equivalent to co-ownership by customers of fungible securities held by the settlement systems.'
  3. 'The fungible funds bridge the budget deficit - the proceeds of divestment subsidise the profligacy of the Union government.'
  4. 'Green Tags function on the principle that electrical power is fungible - that is, one unit of it is identical in use to another, regardless of its source.'
  5. 'Certainly, this appears to be the case for a country like Iran, where the major export is a largely fungible commodity that can be easily diverted to other markets.'
  6. 'I know enough about the appropriations process to know that federal money isn't entirely fungible, but I think this is a valid question because of the enormous debt we have taken on in order to liberate Iraq.'
  7. 'The financial industry is clearly on the leading edge of moving toward e-commerce as a solution; and with fungible products such as insurance or money, it is a perfect e-commerce candidate.'
  8. 'The Court reasoned that since money is fungible, government funding for secular purposes could be used by religious organizations for sectarian ends.'
  9. 'Pure competition, as Schumpeter sees it, exists only in open markets for fungible commodity products.'
  10. 'Law's statement is simply incredible to anyone who realizes that money is fungible and that insurance is not free.'

Definitions

1. (especially of goods) being of such nature or kind as to be freely exchangeable or replaceable, in whole or in part, for another of like nature or kind.

More examples(as adjective)

"issues can be fungible with bonds."

"bonds can be fungible with bonds."

"shares can be fungible with shares."

"issues can be fungible after payments."

"whiles can be fungible as sums."

More examples++

Origin

Late 17th century: from medieval Latin fungibilis, from fungi ‘perform, enjoy’, with the same sense as fungi vice ‘serve in place of’.