Adjective "flame" definition and examples

(Flame may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/fleɪm/

Definitions and examples

noun

A hot glowing body of ignited gas that is generated by something on fire.
  1. mass noun 'a sheet of flame blocked my escape'
  2. 'Nearly 60 per cent of candle fires start when the flame comes into contact with nearby combustible materials.'
  3. 'Just walking down the block, for instance, one can see tiny flames of fire when a match is lit or when a lighter for a cigarette is flicked.'
  4. 'The candle flame represents fire, with black and white candles the most commonly used in magic.'
  5. 'He stared into the fire to avoid her gaze, to focus his thoughts within the flames and the glowing embers.'
  6. 'With a ‘whoosh’, the dried wood and grasses caught fire, and the flames licked around the pyre.'
  7. 'All but one of the items ignited when the candle flame came near the decoration and over half completely disintegrated.'
  8. 'He sat alone in the room, darkness engulfing everywhere except for the area touched by the flames of the fire in the large stone hearth.'
  9. 'Mr Moreton told how on the night of the fire he saw flames licking the roof of one block and tried to raise the alarm - but could not find any fire alarms.'
  10. 'He died instantly, before flames engulfed his body, which was identified from jewellery and dental records.'
  11. 'Nathan shifted on the log, riveting his gaze to the dancing flames of the camp fire.'
  12. 'there's nothing like a holiday to rekindle the flames of passion'
  13. 'After 25-years on and off the road, the flame still burns hot and bright, with the band often clocking in shows at three hours a stretch.'
  14. 'Having been a successful businessman since 1964 he could survive without football, he said, but the management flame still burns.'
  15. 'Even though he ignored her at school the flame of hope that burned in her heart hadn't gone out yet.'
  16. 'The winning flame continues to burn bright within O'Neill's men and it remains to be seen if anyone can snuff it out.'
  17. 'And no matter how many years may pass, his poetic flame will still burn brightly.'
  18. 'You could almost see the flames of competitiveness burning inside him and, although fierce, he was a man of character and kindness.'
  19. 'Her hair was still that fascinating flame red colour and her eyes were still twin jade sparks against the creamy canvas of her complexion.'
  20. 'Try to avoid putting flame bright colours next to wishy-washy pink, or vice versa, but don't be afraid to mix bright colours in zingy combinations.'
A vitriolic or abusive message posted on the Internet or sent by email, typically in quick response to another message.
  1. 'The social dynamics are very different; you think more before responding instead of posting a quick flame.'
  2. 'Our playful dig drew plenty of interesting emails and surprisingly, very few flames.'
  3. 'It also created the culture of flames - abusive emails.'

verb

Burn and give off flames.
  1. figurative 'hope flamed in her'
  2. 'For you, Christmas is about family and traditions, and you rather enjoy the rituals of going to church at midnight and turning off the lights before flaming the plum pudding.'
  3. 'The tip of her arrow seemed to be flaming, orange and yellow dancing along the blood red point.'
  4. 'The thick black hands flamed with an eerie blue sheen in the low light of the bridge, and dark green eyes glowed with a deranged luminescence from deep-set pits under the gunner's brow.'
  5. 'Keyla took the bag and turned her backs to the two; red hair flaming like the fires of the torch.'
  6. 'A sugar maple, winch will flame up so brilliant orange in autumn it seems to warm the air around it.'
  7. 'And now the brief light that had flamed in his eyes was gone.'
  8. 'My face flamed with embarrassment at the blatantly southern direction of my thoughts.'
  9. 'I grabbed my backpack and left, my cheeks still flaming.'
  10. 'Heather looked at her husband quickly and bit her lip, her face flaming.'
  11. 'My cheeks flaming, I felt intense anger flooding my body - and not childish anger but real anger that made steam come out of your ears and possess your whole body.'
  12. 'Her cheeks flaming, Diana buried her face into Jack's shirt.'
  13. 'I could hear the crowd laughing and my cheeks flamed with embarrassment.'
  14. '‘And we got a bit sidetracked,’ she finished, her face flaming red all over again.'
  15. 'The realization flooded over me, and I wrapped my arms around my almost bare stomach, face flaming.'
  16. 'His face flamed unwillingly when he realized that he'd been staring at her for about two minutes straight, unblinkingly.'
  17. 'Her cheeks suddenly flamed as she realized that she might've given herself away.'
Direct a vitriolic or abusive message at (someone) on the Internet or via email.
  1. 'Mom was a reader, a debater (I can not imagine keeping a blog if she was still alive, she would have flamed me to a crisp in either the comments or her own blog), and a passionate learner.'
  2. 'If you have something against that, don't bother freaking out or flaming me, just simply press the back button.'
  3. 'Now if anyone read my previous blog, they will know I got seriously flamed by a person called Acidman, my ‘crime’?'

More definitions

1. burning gas or vapor, as from wood or coal, that is undergoing combustion; a portion of ignited gas or vapor.

2. Often, flames. the state or condition of blazing combustion: to burst into flames.

3. any flamelike condition; glow; inflamed condition.

4. brilliant light; scintillating luster.

5. bright coloring; a streak or patch of color.

6. flame color.

7. intense ardor, zeal, or passion.

8. Informal. an object of one's passionate love; sweetheart: He's taking out his new fla

More examples(as adjective)

"bums can be flame."

Origin

Middle English: from Old French flame (noun), flamer (verb), from Latin flamma ‘a flame’.

Phrase

flame out